Waves Watercolor Painting Process “Lilac Sunset Waves”

Waves Watercolor Painting Process “Lilac Sunset Waves”


Hello everyone and welcome! My name is
Noelle, and in this video, I’m sharing the process for my “Lilac Sunset- Waves”
painting. I applied masking fluid onto my paper
using a regular ol’ toothpick. The masking fluid in my bottle was starting
to dry and become thick, so while I was complaining to my sister about it, she
suggested that I try mixing it with water. I tried that, and tested it, before
applying it to my painting, and it worked fine! Then, I taped the edges of my
painting and began painting the sky. The sky started as a layer of clear water
and then I slowly added color and blended it all together; I like to start
with my lightest and weakest colors first, so I worked from yellows to pinks,
and lastly to blues. There is a strip of purple clouds near
the horizon line that I included in this wash, but I will be painting a darker
later The first layer of the water section is very similar to painting the
sky; in fact, it should somewhat resemble the sky, like a mirror. I used the same colors and process, but this time, I am less fussy with making clouds, and more focused on a smooth gradient from yellow to purple. The section at the bottom of
the piece is meant to resemble wet sand, so I try to make it have some cool
streaks of purple and, overall, appear a bit darker than the water. I liked how it looked while the paint was still wet, however, it dried lighter than I
anticipated. That’s one of the reasons why watercolor is tough, some pigments have a strong color shift. One way I like to paint distant waves is to use the dry
brushing technique and make the paper do the work, rather than stippling little
dots and lines. It always helps to use textured paper, but I have also been able
to get some of this texture using hot-pressed paper, but I have to rely on the
speed of my brush more. Next, I added more details to the larger
waves and some shadows for the soon-to-be seafoam. In addition to the
seafoam floating above the sand, I also added some rounded streaks to resemble thin waves. I thought I wanted to repaint the sky
because I wanted it more vibrant until I realized I liked the softer pastel look
more. To fix this, I removed the new layer of paint by lifting it with a tissue
before it dried. The masked areas protect where I will be painting the seafoam. I am using a rubber cement pick-up to remove the masking fluid. This cotton
paper is really durable, so I’m not worried about ripping it while doing
this, but I’d have to be a lot more careful this with cellulose paper. Waves are tricky things to draw and paint and I wouldn’t recommend this type of
painting for a beginner. I feel like it is tempting to try in paint waves
without practicing from references, but waves do some funky unexpected stuff, so,
as an inexperienced wave painter, it’s handy to paint from a reference which I
will link in the description below. Side note if you are curious about what
supplies I am using they are also listed in the description below including what
colors I’m using and which brand. Back to the clouds, I intended this cloud to be
light and smooth, however it didn’t exactly turn out that way. I started a
little too dark and found myself lifting the paint multiple times. I think I tried to mess with it too much and ended up making the clouds look a bit splotchy. It’s not the end of the world, but that would be something I’ll keep in mind for
a similar piece. If you enjoyed watching this video
consider giving me a thumbs up or subscribing to my channel. For art supplies I use and recommend, you can visit my Amazon Storefront List link in
the description. I’ll receive a commission from items purchased
following the link. You can find me on my social media, I am the most active on my
Instagram. Thank you so much for watching and make it a great day!

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