(Visual Arts 1 of 4) Introduction to Visual Arts

(Visual Arts 1 of 4) Introduction to Visual Arts


The two strands of the Australian Curriculum: The Arts are Making and Responding. Making involves the actual design and production
of an artwork to communicate an idea. This is then shared with an audience. Responding can be in two different ways. It can be as the artist or as the audience. Students explore and analyse an artwork. And then they can interpret it and evaluate it. Viewpoints can be from two different perspectives.
One as the artist or one as the member of the audience. The artist’s viewpoint is the artist’s perspective.They’re the ones who come and create and make the artwork, and they analyse and interpret it. An audience’s viewpoint depends on their interaction
with the artwork. They will come with different expectations and different prior knowledge
and experiences. The elements of Visuals Arts are: line, colour, shape, texture and space. Line can be described as a series of dots joined together. Sometimes I stand one student up, another student up, another student up to demonstrate that a line
is actually a lot of dots joined together. Colour would start with primary and secondary
colours. Primary colours are your beginning colours. Red, yellow and blue can’t be made
by mixing other colours together. If you mix two primary colours together, you make a secondary
colour. The secondary colours are orange, green and purple. You can also describe colour as warm or cool.
Generally speaking, the warmer colours are yellow, orange and red. They remind us of
sunshine and warmth. Cool colours are usually green, purple and blue. And they remind us
of a rainforest or shade, or cool things. Colour can be described as complementary.
If you have a colour wheel, complementary colours are opposite to each other. So when
you put them next to each other, they complement each other. Shape is an enclosed space. Generally, it’s two dimensional. Artists often try to use a two-dimensional surface to make a shape look three-dimensional, even though it’s actually flat. Shape can be described as regular or
irregular, symmetrical or asymmetrical, or geometric or organic. Texture is how something feels when you touch
it. Or how it would look like it felt if you could touch it. Real texture is the actual
texture that you can feel with your fingertip. So you would use your sense of touch. Inferred or implied texture is texture you
can look at. So an artist might be doing a two-dimensional artwork and they’re trying
to make it look three-dimensional, or as if you could actually feel the different surface
qualities. Space is the area occupied between or around or within things. It can be used in a two-dimensional sense or a three-dimensional sense. Often
in an artwork, the actual object or focus of the painting would be considered the positives
of the shape or space. And in between or the background would be considered the negative. The Australian Curriculum website provides
examples of knowledge and skills for each band level across the Arts subject areas.

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