Sunlight through Trees Acrylic Painting Tutorial Beginners on canvas

Sunlight through Trees Acrylic Painting Tutorial Beginners on canvas


Hi, I’m Cinnamon Cooney, your Art sherpa. And today I want to show you how to do this amazing painting called “Awakening”. This is a one point perspective painting of birch trees in winter with a sunrise coming through it. It’s incredibly easy. Even if you don’t think it’s easy, believe it or not it really is. I’m going to show you everything you need to do, even if you’re a beginning artist, to make this at home today. So get your paint, get your brushes, get all your materials. Let’s check them out and get started right now! Let’s get going! Well let’s start this fantastic project. I think again you’re going to be amazed at how easy it actually is to do. The materials are: This is an 11 by 14 canvas board. It’s pre-gessoed and ready to paint. You can get these anywhere. I have a heavy bodied acrylic paint in the colors of cadmium yellow medium or sometimes called cad yellow medium. Quinacridone Magenta. Ultramarine Blue. Titanium White. Mars black. And then also here I have something called acrylic glazing liquid. This particular product lets me slow down the drying time on my paint and also glaze at the same time. And I’ll be painting this in with brushes for acrylic paint. Always be sure and check and make sure your brushes have been made for acrylic paint and not some other type of medium, just to get the best performance out of your experience. Let’s do all the job of sketching this in. Again, I think you’re going to be shocked at how easy it is. I’m going to take this very inexpensive easy to find, might even be in, you know, your backpack or kid’s backpack. This is called the T-square and this is not a pricy thing. What it does is it helps me to get a nice level line because that’s something that I struggle with. I have this line five and a half inches from the top and I’m going to go right across the canvas. Right here. This is my horizon line. If you’re wondering what that term is, it’s horizon. That’s basically where the sky meets the land. Now listen if you don’t have a ruler or anything, something you might not know is that paper towels are engineered incredibly well. And if you line them up with the edge of your canvas like this and this you can get a perfectly straight line just a crazy thing people don’t know. And when I’m really stuck without a ruler I will use my paper towel. So once I have this and this I am ready to start painting in my canvas. I’m going to go over to my brush bucket and I’m going to pick up a really nice brush that I’m going to want to use. I’m going to use this one inch stiff white nylon brush. Now what’s nice about this is it’s not soft and it’s synthetic white nylon fibers which means it’s not going to pull too much water into the brush. Gonna be easy clean. It’s inexpensive and I frankly just like it. Just get something like this. You wouldn’t want it to be so stiff you could clean a pot with it but not so soft that you like wish you were like rubbing it on your face. Somewhere in that middle space. Let’s come over and prep this brush. I’m going to dip it into the water and drag off any extra water that might have pulled in there. See how it goes right in the tips and then dragging that off. And what’s nice about that is again you can see not much extra comes off. If you touch it, it’s moist but it’s not sopping wet. And that’s kind of what you’re looking for. And the first little thing that I’m going to do is I have this yellow right here and I’m gonna get just a dusting of this on the tips of my bristles here. And I’m going to come over to my yellow paint… I mean my white paint! That’s white paint! Yellow to the white and I’m going to make a very light color. You can add a little glazing liquid to that to improve flow if you need it. and you’re going to come right along this horizon line on the edge of the bristles. So how that’s a nice crisp line? And just go right above what you drew in. Now, I used a chalk pencil. It’s actually not graphite. It’s pastel. You could use watercolor. That’s one of my favorites. It’s really really one of my favorites. And what that does is just sort of disappears into the paint. Sometimes graphite bleeds through acrylic paint. So I’m just coming across here. And about a half inch up I’ve got this nice glow. This is my dawn right here could not be easier you can take your brush to the wide, if you want to, and just drag it across. Notice I’m not even worried about this being solid. And there’s a reason why. I’m gonna wipe off my brush on my paper towel. I’m going to come over here and I’m going to get a little of my quinacridone loaded up. I love saying quinacridone. Quinacridone. Alright. So it’s right there. You can see it’s just on the edge of my bristles. There’s still some yellow pigment in there. I’m going to get some more yellow. And as you might think red and yellow make orange. Pull some glazing medium and right into this I’m going to blend softly using just the tips of my bristles. Something about the spring that I want to point out to you here is that when I’m pressing in I’m only having to press in a soft amount. Everything is working at the tips of my bristles where the blend is happening. I’m not having to press in very very har, and the stiffness and design of the brush is doing that work for me. I can come up the center just dusting up a little bit. Again everything is horizontal and it’s really light. And look at that. It blends really well there. A lot of people think… I’m going to rinse out my brush just a little bit to get the yellow out of it. Dragging off the extra water and you can always wipe it off on a paper towel if you’re worried that your brush has too much water. And I’m going to get my pink. a lot of people think that acrylic paint doesn’t blend like oils and it’s true. They’re very different mediums. They’re both wonderful mediums, but acrylic paint can blend like oils. This is a good way of doing that, when you use the glazing medium. So I’m taking the quinacridone over to the white and I’m getting a bright pink. I’ll pull a little glazing here. If you didn’t have glazing, you can use water and it comes from the tap. You know, don’t let stuff get you down. In any way. Bring this across here. This is really fun. Just bringing this nice pink up. See I’m bringing it up? And you can see that this starts to create the drama in the sky. You’re gonna softly feather that in. Softly feather that in Alright. So I’m not working very hard here to cover my canvas and a lot of that is the products I’m using and the brush. Alright. Here we go. That’s very nice. It’s very atmospheric. And I’ve got my brush here. I’m not rinsing it out. I’m going right into the ultramarine blue. I might even add just a titch of the quinacridone there. I’m going to grab white and it’s OK if I grab it from the area where the pink is because we’re mixing in those colors. I’m going to come down from where the pink line is finishing, maybe a half inch and start blending in this soft kind of purple. This ultramarine-y purple that’s very blended with the quinacridone. And now we’ve got this beautiful ombre going. Can pull some of it down in the sky. You don’t have to worry about that. Back and forth. It’s very very easy, very very relaxing. Any place that that you feel something is too harsh you can come back and just softly, softly brush your brush across the canvas. Right. The only time you run into trouble is if you still had a lot of this yellow in this brush up here at this blue because it would want to start making green and I see that messing with students all the time, where they don’t realize they have yellow still in their brush, once they’re in the blue of a sunset or sunrise and it starts to grab their colors and they don’t know why and that is why. Is that yellow is still hiding in that brush. Another reason why this brush is great because the synthetic filament. The fact that it doesn’t over pull pigment in allows me to really clean it and it doesn’t get overloaded. Right. So once I have that, one place you can check if you want to see where you’re at. You can come right here and check your paper towel. I’ve only really got pink pigment on there, so I can come right into the blue I pull a little bit out onto my brush like this. Isn’t this fantastic? OK. So I’m going to get a little of my white and I want a very light color, because this is winter. This is winter. So we’re just pulling our blue right here. Pulling it right in. Once we have a nice load, you can see that load. We’re going to come here and blend the top part of the sky. Pull it down into the purple because that’s what you want. You want that blend pulled down in. You know, again, you can softly dust. Gives you a lot of drama. And where do we like drama? On our canvas not in our lives, right? So we’re putting all of our drama on our canvas. Not into our lives. Good place for it. All those feelings. All the drama. Right here. Right here in this amazing sky. And you can just see that the brush is really doing a tremendous amount of the work for me. Which is just fantastic. Now once I have this it’s a good time to rinse out my brush quite well. I want all the color out of it. And I might even change to cleaner water if I assess that my water is dirty. Sometimes to have very bright colors in a painting, You want to change water pretty often. Right, because the pigments in there and then it can get back in your paint and gray out your color. If you need to you can wipe off your brush on paper towel and right here I’m gonna kind of change my brush direction. I’m going to kind of do a really fun and a little bit crazy thing. I’m going to take my quinacridone magenta, again, right here on the tip of my brush, pull it over to my white. Get my light, light pink. It’s a little darker but it’s a light light pink. Right. First thing I’ll do is I’ll come along where my land hits my sky far off in the distance. Far off in the distance. You know. And now you know, it’s a horizon line, which is always a great great thing to know. It’s a fantastic thing to know. Just dragging the brush right along there. Oh I like that. Now let’s make sure we’ve got lots of white load into our brush so it’s very soft pink. It’s very soft pink. We’re actually lightening what we had there a little bit. And then and this is going to be an interesting thing. Imagine that there’s a fan here and that fan is going to curve to about, just- If this- If you mentally divide this in half right here just a little bit above the halfway point you’re going to pull this down And fan this out. Just a little bit. Come across here. You can come right across here. Right? All the way across here. Come right across. Fan that out. Fanning it out. Fan fan fan. Get more white paint if you need it. Right. You don’t actually have to get more pink because the pink is such a powerful pigment. When you see quinacridone being made in the paint factory, it’s very interesting because it’s a really beautiful pigment and it just- Just glows. It’s really fantastic. It’s a wonderful craft that people still do today. Is make paint. So I’ve got this feathering. Can you see how the feathering is happening? It’s coming out. You can see these little… These little feathered light brush strokes right here. How they’re splaying open, looking almost a little bit like hairs right there. You know I’m trying to make a fan, as if the light is flaring out. That’s all I’m doing. I’m going to wipe off my brush and I’m going to load up my blue, and get some more white. A lot of white. There we go. And I’m gonna start right here. And I’m going to softly start the blue part of the ombre. This… This effect, this gives such a tremendous visual impact. The colors are pleasant and uplifting. The colors are really inspiring. And the way that the lines kind of happen, it gives you that impact. Imagine that all of these lines are converging to this one point right here. Do feather those in. Do feather them in. Do feather them in to that one point right there. That one point right there. Imagine it in your mind. You have this first little bridge dusted right here. Right here right here right here. You can wipe your brush off. Then you can come get your blue. Load that on the brush. It’s fun to load paint on the brush. Just love watching it go on right there. Get right into that white. Right into that white. Loading it on. Isn’t that fun? All right. Now I’m going to make sure I’ve got some of my glazing. You could use water. Just make sure what your goal is. Blending in acrylic paint is about this part still being wet when I put this part, before it’s dry, in. And I’m going to continue that soft radiating convergence. Imagining that one point right there. And all of this. He’s going into- Like this would go straight up. Right? Because that’s where it would be. This part is really fun. Now, we’re gonna do a part with sunbeams. That’s really fun, that enforces this. It makes us feel even more like you’re going into a visual tunnel. Super fun stuff. Load the brush again. Take a deep breath if you need it. (inhales deeply) And slowly let it out, and just know that, you know, this is your relaxing time. This is your time to just sort of mentally unwind. Process your week. Right? Very little time these days to just unwind. And process our weeks. Here we go. Just get a little more white paint if you need it. Almost done with this part. And you can kind of see that I’m just enforcing that convergence. I’m loving that. Fun stuff. We’ll make sure it’s painted to the edge, here. It’s pretty good. Canvas is covered. That’s pretty good. Alright! I’m going to dry this right now with my hair dryer. If you’ve been painting for a while this is a really good time to stand up, take a break, stretch a little bit and move. If you’ve been keeping up with me you might be ready to just dry it and keep going. It’s really up to you at home. Just to make sure that your keeping your creative space comfortable, relaxing and stress free. Right. I’m gonna dry it with my hair dryer. Now that your piece is dry we can start putting in those beginning rays of sunlight. I really love the name of this painting. This was actually named by people who paint along with me and I really appreciate those moments where I get to engage. And you guys give me insight. It’s super appreciated. Always love that. So always keep out opportunities for that. If you’d like to participate in things like that you can always go check out The Art Sherpa dot com. For more information. I’m going to take this number six brush. It’s a bright. Which means that the filaments are a little bit shorter. These are also synthetic and they are also firm and this is a really well-made brush so I know I’m going to have a good time painting with it. I’m going to come here on this corner of my brush. Just get the smidgeniest smidgen of paint and I’m gonna come right here to that center point that I was imagining earlier and then make a little yellow dot that I can see. Right there. Because that is where the whole rest of this painting is going to be designed off of. This is one point perspective and that there is our one point. So I’m going to take a little of my white paint and a little of my yellow. And you can see how just it’s barely dusted here. See how it’s just barely dusted? And I can even come on the edges of this and I’m going to just drag them up in a little bit. Not too much of this I don’t want to be too solid. I want these to be open because there’s a lot I’m gonna be working here. But I’ve got to start designing the glow. The dawn glow. You can go ahead and get some glazing liquid if you have it. You can also just thin the paint and make it more transparent with water. That is OK. Those are all good choices and I’m going to just create the soft impression that’s sunlight. This is going to be really really wonderful Loading my brush. A little more white. Another way you can do this is something called dry brush which means that the brush doesn’t have a lot of water and it skips along the canvas allowing a lot of what’s underneath to show through. You don’t have to be a perfectionist here but it can really help to try to make sure that this is flared pretty evenly out there. It just lets it shine through the trees which is what you’re going to definitely definitely want. So I’m going to be back on my radiation. Just keep dusting that out. You can use glaze or dry brush. Whichever technique works for the materials that you have. Right. We want to just do that. Now here in this landscape we’re going to have some fun. I’m going to take a little of my white paint and I’m going to dust it. It doesn’t take a lot of yellow to tint my White. And I’m going to just have this and I’m going to also kind of pull a straight line down, and just a couple little brushstrokes that are radiating out. Once my trees are in I will absolutely put this in a little more… Emphatically, I guess is what I would say. With more conviction. But right now I want just an impression. Sometimes you paint things with a conviction on your canvas. They’re very aggressively stated with bold strokes in bright colors. But in this case we weren’t just a dusting. So be a little timid with what you’re doing. Right? Try to make sure that these lights, that the lights are coming to that point. That’s the trick of this. This is the trick of this art illusion. A lot of art is illusion. Is that you want to make sure that the light and shadow converges right there. Which is why I make sometimes those light marks and then use them as guides. So that the implication of that brush stroke goes right here. It’s really nice and I think you’ll like it So I’m just still going. It’s just an interesting fun creative day and I’m just still going and I’m just putting in that first little bit of this implied sunlight. And again like I said, you want to leave a lot of your canvas still showing through. You don’t want to take it all away. This is a good place to- One of the places that you can do, is you can make also a little bit of an orange here, if you can see that we just took a small amount of this quinacridone right here in this cad yellow. You can even get some glaze, and I’m doing, what I’m doing here is I’m offloading. Sometimes you want to offload your brush. A little the paint back onto the pallet and I’m going to come in just add a hint of that slightly orange color which is in the sky radiating out. Again converging at that point. Not a lot though. Don’t go crazy. So now that we have this we have the beginning of the sunlight. And this is really fantastic. I’m going to rinse my brush out and rinse it out well. Staying with my number six bright that you see here. Staying with it for sure for sure. And I’m going to start putting in my trees. So a couple of things on trees First of all, one of the things you sort of think of trees in your head. Trees can give new painters anxiety. And that’s really only because you probably haven’t done one in a while. And you have an emotional feeling about them because we’ve seen a lot of trees. No matter where we live in the world, probably got some trees that we look at. And so there’s a lot going on and your job right now is going to be to let that go and just be about the line and remembering this process. The tree’s going to be slightly thicker at the bottom and get ever more tapered as it goes up. You don’t want to over taper. It’s not a triangle but you don’t want it to get thicker at the top than it is at the bottom. So just keep that in mind for this next part and you’ll be really successful. Alright. So to get my tree color. I’m gonna first take a little of my ultramarine blue over to my black. I don’t want to use a lot of black here it’s a very powerful black. The one that we have. Mars Black has a lot of pigment in it. Grabbing a little of my glazing liquid and I’m going to make a lighter… Ooh. See, I grab too much and then I just offloaded it because I grab too much. That’s what you do. It gets away from you. I want this to be distinctly gray. What these trees, these furthest away trees, I definitely definitely want to be slightly lighter. Lighter. Because they’re far away. You know they’re far away. They are lighter. I’m gonna have about- My first tree is going to be off to the right of my sunlight, and down about a finger, and I’m going to do this. It’s very messy, very like crazy and brave, But I’m gonna just take my brush and I’m going to make that little line. Now once I’ve made it, I knew where my trees going to grow. And I’m gonna grow my tree up. It’s just a line. It’s just a thought. It’s just an idea straight up. Look at that. Now we have one and it’s what we needed. Right? And I’m going to come over, oh, about a eighth of an inch even A quarter inch. Very very small amount. I’m gonna make another parallel line. But as I come up the tree and just so you know, I’m steadying my hand a little bit by resting on the canvas. I’m gonna let these two lines converge or merge, so you can see that my distant tree is a little thicker at the bottom. And it gets thinner at the top. That’s all it takes. Super easy. Grab a little more of my glazing liquid. And then come over. There’s going to be like a sister tree back here. That’s happening and we’re going to put it down. I’m going to come down a little bit below my horizon line. And then I’m gonna make that little line. There it is. That’s what it is. Take that little line. I’m going to grow it on up. Grow it on up. And do the same thing. A parallel line about… An eighth of an inch over. Coming up, and converging. I don’t have branches yet. I’m gonna put those in in just a little bit. Right? There we go. Cause I have a couple more of these lighter trees and then I’ll start adding a few of these faraway branches. You can grab a little more white if you need it. See I’m just mixing it around and then loading it on the edge of the bristles. That’s really really my trick here. Now even though this tree is a little bit closer it’s smaller because it’s a younger tree. A couple of things that you can say about trees in art, is if you like to say that a tree is younger next to an older tree, it would then be a little bit skinnier. Wouldn’t it? But sometimes you might make a tree skinnier because it’s far far away. And those are just things that you can do in art. That you might like. I like them. Alright. Just putting this in. I’m doing a little cross stroke here. Can you see this? Where I am helping the tree feel a little more defined by the direction of my brush stroke and the way that’s offloading pigment. If you’re painting with a beginner paint, a student economy paint, you might have a little trouble with coverage. And if you do, all you do is let it dry a little bit and come back like this and add another coat and it will cover right up. So don’t get stressed about that little stuff. I’m going to continue loading my paint. I’m offloading. That’s where I press the brush down and then I’m reloading, getting it right on the edge there. I’m trying to keep the paint out of this metal part which is the ferrule. It can wear out your brush quicker. And if you have a brush you’re really fond of you may want to take those extra steps to care for it. Ok. I’m gonna come down even further. It’s closer to the left. It is sort of not midpoint but a little bit to the right of the midpoint. I’m gonna grow this one up. Now I always like to think my lines are growing a tree up This one’s going to be a little- Little thicker, it’s a little closer, it’s a little older, this birch is. You know, been here just a little longer than these guys back here. I’m going to paint all that in. If I need more color, I’ll go back to my all ultramarine blue and my black Add a little white. It’s not a problem to remix. Right? See how we did that? Just not a problem. If you don’t mix large amounts of paint together it’s easier to control the color, and then also help save you money, because you’re not overusing your paint. Pretty fantastic stuff right there. That’s all it was. You can see how I just went down, where I just made this little horizontal stroke on the flat of the brush and it just painted in my tree. Now once I have these in I’m gonna rinse this brush and put it to the side cause I’ll need it again. But I’m going to get a small brush. I’m going to get a detail brush. Lots of detail brushes in the world. I am going to get this nice number four detail and I’m going to use this to paint in my branches. Now you could get- If you have trouble controlling your brushes, like they’re acting out. But if you are having trouble getting control over your lines with your brushes, one of the tricks that you can do is paint with a smaller brush and I’ll show you what I mean with that in a minute. But right now you can see that I have loaded this brush to about the midway point. It’s round, it’s tapered. So this is a number four round that you can see here and I’m going to just make some very fine lines. To represent some distant little branches that are coming on. I’m using the gray this particular time. It’s just a little darker than the gray I initially had. So if I need to lighten it I can. See, I’m coming here just on the tip and I’m making this swirling around. See, I swirl it around like that and then I’m gonna roll and load right there. See how that goes? Swirling around. Roll. That’s offloading and then reloading. Right, and that gives me paint exactly where it’s have a lot of control. I’m going to come down this branch.Branches closer to the ground will be thicker than branches that are the top of the tree, and the branch coming off the tree should be thinner and finer than the trunk it’s attached to. And also I think one of the things that happens to new students with branches is they don’t grow them out long enough. They make them very short. Cause they’re not feeling really confident in that branch. And so they get a little- They get a little short. When I’m bringing it up, another thing I’m doing is I’m lightening my stroke. I’m lightening my brush stroke as I’m going out. Now I’m successful with this brush even though it’s a fairly good sized round because it is really engineered to taper to a fine point. If the brush you’re painting with is not engineered to taper- Here I am off loading and reloading- Then what you’ll need to do is switch to a smaller detail brush. I’m going… Little… Little branches. Just rolling out and can say I just press hardest at the beginning of the stroke. Lighten the stroke, lighten the stroke, lighten the stroke and then this little bend here just tells me that I could grow a little branch right there. That’s what I could do. And so I’m going to. I’m gonna rinse this out. I’m going to show you another choice, if I’m not having success. So I’m looking in my brush bucket and I’m finding another brush. I’m gonna pull this out. This is a number one. Let’s compare it to what I was painting with. This is a much bigger brush than this one. This is not particularly expensive. This isn’t pricey. It is made by somebody that makes brushes very well but it’s not pricey. Right? One thing you’re gonna notice that both of these brushes have in common is a fairly fine point. And that’s really the success in branches, is about the fineness of this point. If you look at the brush and you say that it’s sharp, it should really really hold a sharp line. Sometimes with economy brushes when you go to press down, it just opens and flails out like a fan and it just undermines your line and you feel like you can’t make a branch. But what it was is somebody didn’t make their brush right. That’s all that happened to you. Try to find brushes with a good fine point. I’m going to demo this one because again this isn’t, you know, an extremely expensive brush. It’s just well-made. And if you know what you’re looking for in brushes you can find well-made brushes in a lot of different price points. So here I am again. I’m rolling to offload which you see me do. And I am getting the paint on the tip. I’m going to come here and show you some more fine branches. So, see, it’s just about running a little fine line. I press a little harder in the beginning. And then I want a little friend down here and then this little friend should be a finer line than the one next to it. All of your branches should start out a little bit thicker here where they connect to the tree and they get finer and finer as they grow out. So I’m going to take another little branch up here. See? I’ll get some more paint if I need it, then I do the swirl, swirl, swirl, and then I roll. It’s like I’m collecting, right, and I get a little amount on the end there and then I’m gonna just keep going. See this brush stroke is thicker And there we go. That’s all it takes. I’m gonna rinse that out. I’m gonna continue on with my number four because I really like it and I enjoy it but that’s just to give you an example of that you have choices. So I’m back to my number four which has the good edge. I’m gonna loaded it up and I’m going to finish out these branches. Loading it up, doing the swirl around. The offload roll, and a reload. It’s just my move. I’m gonna come here, create more branches. I have created a thick branch right here. And so what I can do is just slightly thicken my tree to create balance there and that’s just how you handle it if you do something kind of unusual. Every once in awhile you’ll see me dip in the water and come and offload the brush. So what I do is I just take just the tip maybe just a small amount of that and then put that in and that just helps me thin my water. I could also use a medium. Even my glazing medium. And here I am just giving this tree branches. Let’s give him another one over here. Again pressing harder at the beginning of the stroke. And then just lightening that pressure up as I go, converging out another little deviant branch. Getting some paint on my brush. Right there. Making any little adjustments or smoothings that you need to do. I always like having to think about adjusting a painting. And actually that’s the best part of it. It’s sort of the time when I get to relax. Notice that I’m taking my branches, I mean right far out. They’re not short. I think something that I see and I want to give an example, a lot are new painters, they do And I’m gonna show you how I fix it. Is they come up and they make a branch out and then they go like this and they make kind of a fork or an antler, and it doesn’t feel right to them. And so what they did is they didn’t come very much long distance. And then when they want to do the convergence, they just came out of the same point. Right? Without feeling that branch, because they were having some anxiety. Generally when I see that happen is almost always related to anxiety about branches and feelings they have from previously. So what I want to say is if you find yourself doing this, take a deep breath. (inhales deeply) Let it out. Reload your brush and I’m gonna show you how to correct it. Right. So reloaded. I’m gonna come right back here and I’m gonna go longer. Longer than maybe you might be comfortable with. Look how long I went there. And if you have, thicken this guy back up. Take this and then maybe go in unexpected direction, because branches will do that. When you see this bend it’s a good time to add another little guy. And so that’s how if you are doing the forks the antler or any of those things that you kind of correct it. You don’t have to panic. You just might want to add a little bit of character to that. See how I change that? That’s just a simple fix that you can do. And don’t ever feel bad that that’s happening. That happens to everybody. Everybody goes through that. Anxiety happens. So I’m going to make this branch, because it’s closer to the ground, slightly thicker. Take this up. You can see that I often kind of meander that. So where I have this meander is a good time to add another little branch, and then another little branch and then I can have one here and they can be fine and light. They don’t have to be…. Very particular. Now the next trees that happen- Well, these trees are closer, they’ll be darker, they’ll be bigger and they’re really going to create my tunnel of light that makes this amazing perspective. So take my brush. I’m going to go ahead and prime it with a little bit of water if you need to rinse out. Go ahead and do so. Get your Blue. Right? I’m gonna take this over here and I’m gonna mix a little of my black. Now I’m mixing a good amount of this Blue-ed black, because all my trees in front are gonna use up a good amount of paint. But you’ll notice that I’m not mixing the whole plops of paint together and that’s because I want to have some control over the color. I’m off loading my brush, pressing it down. Now I’m not… Maybe I can show it to here. It’s going to get some paint on my hand. I am not ever pressing my brush like this. This is terrible. This breaks the heel the brush. I’m always keeping the bend, whether it’s at the tip of my brush or whether it’s at the heel more perpendicular to the surface when I’m wiping off paint, as I just got paint all over myself but hopefully that helps you see something that you might not have known. Make you more successful in what you’re doing in your art. So I’m gonna, again, prime the brush with a little bit of water. I’m going to add some white to this. I want a dark gray but you don’t want a black. I definitely want this just to be darker than the other trees. That I have already painted in. So that’s pretty dark. If you want it to be a little more blue you can now just go get a little more blue. See how it gives you more control? You’re not wasting paint. You’re just making adjustment decisions about what’s happening. So now I’m going to make a little tree right here. This is over to the right of this guy. Coming on the edge of my number six bright, and I’m just growing it up. All of the trees in this are going to go right off the canvas. And I’m maybe gonna come down a little bit, almost to where the pink and the purple have come together. This one is not quite a half inch. What?!? it’s definitely bigger than the trees that I have painted so far. I’m gonna go ahead and make the rounded horizontal stroke here. Paint these in. These in super easy. Just paint it all in, between the lines. Painting it in. You know it’s important to think about brush pressure when you’re painting. Not only can it help you succeed in art but it can also elongate and improve the- The life of your art materials. Which is always helpful. Alright. So I’m really happy with that. I’m gonna prime my brush with a little water. You need a little more black in there? I will. Offload, offload. Reload. And you can see now, now that you see it, you can see I’m going perpendicular not pressing down flat, which also keeps the bristles from opening up into the ferrule. It’s just a little thing that will help you. OK. So this- this tree’s going to be almost to the edge here. Couple inches over and down. Here she grows. She grows up and I’ve decided it’s a girl. [laughs] You can do that in your painting. A little bigger than the one behind her. And now paint that in. Just enjoy painting them. This does not have to be, you know, a uniform color/ You just want these gray to be slightly darker than what you have in the background, is all. Take a deep breath. I’m gonna get some more blue cause I feel like we’re losing the coolness of this black. I might even grab some gel medium to improve the flow because my studio is hot. You can also see that extends the paint I’m just going to make sure she’s painted in very nicely. Again if you’re having trouble getting coverage. If you’re like I’m painting over it. I’m seeing everything underneath, that’s probably just the paint that you’re using, and the trick for that is to allow it to dry and just do a second coat. All right. We’re going to make one big one right here. Right. We want it to be over slightly, sort of between these two. So it can cast its shadow, and just a little bit down from this one at this angle. So let’s load a little bit of paint on our brush right here. Plant a seed. We’re painting right over those branches we work so hard for but that’s how we got the layering. We’re not even gonna worry about that. Pulling that up. Hopefully you’re breathing and you’re still feeling like this is easy because if you think about all you’ve done is made line’s. Wiggling lines, straight lines, but lines nonetheless. Now this one I want to be even thicker than this one. This is going to be the oldest and closest tree to me so I’m going to grow this up. Let me grow this up. But it still tapers a little bit and then paint all that in. Go ahead and grab your paint. You can do it. Come across here. This is really fun. Just going across. Alright. I’ve got to grow some more trees in my forest. I feel like I do. I think I need another one right here. It needs to be just nudged over to the right of this one. And I want that for the light so I can create those shadows that give me my one perspective effect. It’s going to make this really feel real. Very dramatic. I’m going to come down, kind of a little bit in this space just maybe a little right here. Growing this up. growing it up, growing it up. Get your brush a little bit wet. If you need a little white, go ahead and pit that in your paint. Offloading and reloading. I get asked a lot why my paint goes further than maybe somebody painting on line with me. And the reason I always put everything I’m using in the description is not because I feel like you have to paint with the exact same materials but I want you to know exactly what I’m doing. So you can trouble shoot at home. Just in case in one particular event it is your paint or it is your brush. The other things that can impact you is the fluidity of the paint. That’s how nicely it flows off this brush. Right. So how much water or medium you’re thinning your paint with can impact how easily it exits the brush and covers the canvas. And believe it or not the canvas itself can impact that too. If this is very rough, it will fight the paint. So you’re always looking for a balance of pigment in the paint, fluidity of the paint, surface that you’re painting on. I always love how it’s never ever about student though. It’s never that you guys, you know, aren’t getting it because almost always you really are getting it much better than you know. Much better then you know. I grabbed some more ultramarine blue. I’m pulling a little more black in. I might get a little more white. I like the coolness of this. I’m offloading. If your brush were to get really overloaded with paint you can always take your towel, squeeze it out. See how that’s completely pulled out? So don’t ever feel like, oh no, it’s gotten away from me! Nothing’s ever gotten away from you in your painting. You are totally in charge and in control. So I’m going to put this just slightly up at an angle from the other. Bringing my little trunk up. Right over my lovely branches I know it. He’s going to be smaller like these guys. He could be a little thicker. He could be a little thinner but we’re still making sure that he’s just slightly more tapered as he’s coming off the canvas. You can have as many trees in this forest as you want. I highly recommend. That you listen to your heart. I know that sounds goofy but it works. Alright. Sometimes when I’m having trouble getting into a spot you might notice me roll my brush in my fingers. And what that is is I’m looking to get a better angle. I’m angling for a better angle. See, and I just rotated around because I know I’ve got more paint on the other side. As I’m pressing the brush down sometimes it presses the pigment through the bristles and so I can rotate my brush to get an ever bigger amount of paint. Through this experience. Little things you might not know. I am dipping to prime. Pulling out some more black. I think I’ll need a little blue here. I don’t know how much paint I’m going to need left but I want to make sure I have it. That got too light. See that there? So one thing you can do. I’m gonna wipe off. I’m gonna pull out a little more black. There you go, because I really really don’t want this to be too light. I’m getting the blue in there. Getting the blue in there. Just getting the blue in there. Pressing off. Wipe if you need to. Got little of your white there. Not too much. See? Ahh! Now I’m back. And it can take a minute. Lots of ways to do this. This is just one way. Alright. The last tree. Can you believe we’re at the last tree? It’s so exciting. So we’re going to plant him Right here. He’s going to grow up. And yes he too is covering some of our lovely distant branches. But we’re going to put more lovely branches on our tree so it’s OK. Coming over about an inch and just growing him up. It’s fun to grow up your trees on your canvas. Coming down using the edge of my bristles. It’s really good. Really easy. Rotating my brush as I need to to get better coverage. Better angle on my project. That’s all I’m doing. Alright. OK! This is pretty fun stuff! Now we can add some more of our detail branches. SoI’m gonna rinse this brush off. I’m gonna wipe it out on my paper towel. Rest to the side. I’m going to prime my round again. Do my go around, go around, go around. Kind of grabbing these yummy bits of paint that I have here and there. Get some of this white if you need it. You’re just trying to make some more of your color up. Now, because these are birches the branches look very nice if they’re slightly darker than the tree. That’s just something you can do. Now some times they’re going to tuck behind trees that are in front. Since this tree is behind these two any time that the branch would cross. It won’t go in front of these two. Just something to think about. It’s got to stop, doesn’t it? Because it would be hidden behind and that’s just something to think about when you’re layering your forest. Is how would the branches- This one’s going to be slightly thicker branch to lay in. Maybe it peeks out. There it goes. See how that creates the illusion of depth and that’s what we’re really creating not just an illusion of light but an illusion of depth. I definitely going to want a lot of branches on this tree, but this tree is slightly in front of this tree, so I’m going to do this tree next. So I don’t know if you can remember math in school but there is an order of operations and in painting there is one too. Even though you’re always and forever changing the rules in art and that is our job as artists. To forever be changing the rules. You’ll see me frequently load back up and that’s because I don’t want to be making a beautiful line. and not leaving a branch behind. There you go. Now of course sometimes when you go down you could have a very twiggly fine branch, even those close to the ground and that’s OK. You just want to make sure that you don’t have a branch that is larger up here than the trunk that is attached to. And you probably just visually often don’t want to make it bigger than the branch that’s down here, though that might happen in nature sometimes. If you see that you definitely want to be working from a reference. So he’s the furthest back in this grouping of three here to the left. So let’s branch him up. I’d like to them branch up. I’m dipping in the water. I am increasing my fluidity. Offloading. Reloading. Because I don’t want to work for the branch. You’re having trouble with branches. You can smooth your canvas. You can improve your brush. Improve the fluidity of your paint. I’m gonna just wander here. A little bit up. Alright. Look at how well you’re doing. I love, love these beautiful wandering bare branches. Then I’m going to do this one. This is a very strong emphatic branch. so it pulls in front of its friends. Feel like I have a place for branch right here. Coming up. Look at that. Definitely still loading my brush. Maybe this one kind of broke in the winter. Lost its friend. You’re just looking. You’re just looking for space where you feel like you need balance. Look at that little branch coming off there. If you need water, get water. Increase fluidity. The pigment. Get more pigment. Pull out. Offload. Reload. And then look what we can do. We’re going long. Making sure it’s thicker here so it’s believable. What we’re trying to say is that this branch is supported and if you want it to feel believable that’s what you’re trying to say. It’s just art so don’t take it too seriously. Try to keep it fun. As I’m coming here and giving this lovely little tree tons and tons of happy little branches. Alright. Here we go. We’re doing wonderful. We’re having a great time. Offloading our brush. Reloading. This is easy. You’ve got this. Just wandering some branches around. Right. Use the brush that works for you. And this is the last guy we gotta make branches with. So I’m gonna pull a little pigment here. I’m gonna grab a little blue. See I’m swirling it around? You need the white, get the white. Just want branches. If it’s creeping up your brush wipe it off. Reload. Reprime. There ya go. Make it easy. Now I’m gonna make a nice forceful branch right there, isn’t it? Wandering off there. Has a little bridge out. Fun stuff. I like this stuff. Hopefully you like it too. Want to do two more things after this. Now… Just keep…. Wandering your branches up. Sometimes….. You have to come to the end of a branch, and drag, pull back down to really strengthen it out. Prime my brush with water. Get some more paint. Come back over here. Think about this branch again. You think about your branches. There we go. It’s good, good. Good, good. You’re doing good. And I’ll wander one over here. It’s just- You could just put branches all day. You could just go branch-tacular. I’ve done that before in my forest. Just got really branchy. Alright. Once I have that, I’m gonna rinse this out. Put this to the side. I’m going to go back to my number six bright. You can see I’m just not using a lot of brushes on this painting because there’s just not a lot you need to use. I’m going to go just get my white, and it’s OK that it’s going to pick up some of the gray that’s right here. Ok? But I’m gonna make a very light gray on a very dry brush. And I’m going to start at my furthest back tree. I’m just going to pull some highlights and then I thought I’d just give it a little bit, little dashes of highlights. You want to be careful that you don’t paint out your forward branches when you’re doing that. And I know that my highlight is on the left side of the tree because the sun shining on it from the left of it. That’s the easy way to know. I’m gonna come along this tree and I’m going to just pull this little highlight. The one thing I can do is I can come up, even my branch here, add a little highlight just on the tips of my bristles. Pulling this across, creating this little birch-tacular effect. Pretty easy to do. Loading more paint. Come up here. I can define this branch as being a little more forward than its friends by its highly. You know. This little tree can have a highlight too. Give these little trees highlights. Have fun! I’m going to skip over this branch that’s here, where I’m doing a highlight. Skip- Oh! There’s a little branch you gotta skip. So just try to make sure that you’re paying attention. If you do paint over a branch that you would want highlight just this forward facing one. All you do is go back with your dark paint and paint it back in. If you lose one don’t worry. Just paint it back in. Well, sunlight’s coming from here. So it has to be on this side of the tree, right? Skip my little branch. I might let this one have a little highlight right there. Just a dust. Just dust it. Come along here. Don’t get stressed out. Roll my brush over too. That nice little highlight. So you can kind of see how these are starting to take shape. You know. Might grab some more white paint, just- just make sure that they’re… You know, that they’re thought out and they’re painted in. There we go. So then when I switch to this side, now the lights coming from the right. I think I said that wrong. I think I said the light’s coming from the left and from the right but that’s my dyslexia what it is is the light coming from the left in his on the left side of the tree another light coming from right. It’ll be on the right side of the tree. Oh I love- I love when stuff like that happens. Your brain is just cooking and working and then you have those moments. I certainly have them I don’t know if you have them in your life. Just struggling through the turn signals some days. You ever just struggle through the turn signals? You’re just like… Just working that. Keep going. So I’m just doing the same. Now I’m on the right hand side. Pulling this nice light. You can even come up- Up that branch a little bit, dust a little light. and this one here could have a little light coming up it. It’s nice, right? Come across here You could be stressed out. Just skip your branches and you’re just implying a little bit. Giving it a little bit of shape. And space. Alright. You can see I just go dot dot where it’s visually complicated. Don’t stress myself out. Ff you need to come along the edge of the tree on the edge of your bristles and then pull back, that’s a good way of doing it as well. Come along here. See, I can just do that. Just shaping. Implying the shape of the tree. Little lighter up here. But it’s happening. Grab a little more. Now I got a lot going on in this tree so I can come along here and make sure that I’m skipping my highlight around the branches where I need to. If I lose one, I’ll paint it back. Won’t stress over it. We won’t stress over it. Here I go. Put a little underneath here. Here we go, here we go. Here we go. Pulling it, pulling it, pulling it. Just along this side of the tree. I gotta follow a branch up I’ll do that, pulling it across. Having fun. Now. While my brush still has this sort of light yellow light gray, I’m gonna add a smidge of yellow. See how I grayed that yellow? And then I’m gonna come here on some of the trees just real quick give them a spot of sunlight. Right. Give them a little spot of sunlight. Not all of them. Just some of them, here and there. It’s just a nice thing that you can do and it… It warms the piece overall, I think. Just dusting a little spot of sunlight on the light side It’s a good time to look. So what I’m gonna do is I’m gonna take this off of my easel and put it flat and show you how I lay in the shadows. This is such an easy thing. All you have to do to succeed at this is have a straight line that you can count on like on a ruler and remember where your dot is, which you paint it in, so it should be easy to remember. Let’s get started. OK so I’ve got this on the table. I don’t know why I flipped that upside down. That’s not going to help me. (laughs) Well fix it for your orientation in post. We’ve got this placed down. We know our trees are. Now we have to start casting shadows and to do that all we have to do is remember where our dot was, which is right here, to put it in where all the light is radiating out at. Well all these shadows that are supposed to happen are radiating from there. And so all I have to do is take a ruler or the paper towel, like I suggested and use that to create my vanishing lines. So I’m going to orient first my ruler on that dot and I might even because I can paint it out just for the purposes of that so you can see where I’m always orienting. OK. So now I’m oriented on the dot, I’m gonna come to the edge of my tree. See the edge of the tree there? And I’m going to draw this funny, interesting little line. Skipping over where the trees are. Now, staying with my dot, I’m gonna come to the far side of the tree. Isn’t this crazy? And I’m going to make another little line. It’s kind of crossing into some of its friends. That’s OK. They do that sometimes. Now this tree, it already has its shadow, doesn’t it? Because this tree’s shadows crossing. So all I have to do is make sure that I add, still orienting on this dot, a little extra shadow. On this side for that extra bit that would be cast. And then I can come down to this tree, to it’s corner down here. Uh-oh! I lost my dot. Always keep your dot or it’ll throw off your where you’re sighting. I love when people can do this just by eye. So do you see the stagger of this shadow? It’s spectacular. I’m going to come here and orient on my dot on the edge of my tree. There it is. Orient on the dot. And the edge of my tree. Right? And I may need to come- Whatever side you need to get a good view of it. That’s what you need. Make sure that it’s casting. You might need to… Edge it over. And that’s just what you’re looking at is like are these edged up? Now from here. There’s my dot. Here’s my tree. Sketching it down. There’s my dot. Here’s the edge of my tree. Boy, you anywhere you put this dot is where the shadow cast. It’s such a cool trick. Such a cool trick! You can just do this all day. You can’t believe how cool and how much fun you can have. We’ll do more projects like this some time. So now I’ve got this tree. I’m going to cast its shadow. I’m gonna line up my dot. Let me line up my dot and the edge of my tree. There you go and you’re already starting to see the forest take shape, aren’t you? And it’s just about making sure that I keep my adjustment as much as I can to that dot in my trees. Right here at the far edge. Right, far edge. Now these trees here. This furthest tree, his shadow is like this. Well, these two have a lineup that’s sort of interesting. A little bit. Making sure I’m lined up on my dot though. That’s the big thing. So here we go. Coming down here. And then there’s a sliver between those two, isn’t there? I come to the far side of these guys. Making sure I’m still oriented on my dot. Alright. I might need to move that over just a little bit. Just making sure I’m oriented on my dot. There is that shadow just casting across. Well this guy, he’s got a shadow too. He has a sliver over from his friends. This is where the drama is, leaving those slivers is important stuff. There we go. Did I keep my dot? That’s the trick. Dots and lines. Oh goodness! Checking that I got all my trees in. And they’re all casting their shadows. I can return this to my easel to paint in the shadows. If that was your first time doing that you might have been like, dots! Lines! Shadows! Why?!? But actually this is fantastic and if you learn the skill the dramatic pieces that you can do in one point perspective are just endless. It’s really satisfying and it really is one of the things that a beginner can embrace early on in art. Let me get my paint. I’ve got my handy little number six bright back here and I’m going to come mix my shadow. Priming my brush again in my now clean water because I’m also going to have to do sun light. I’m going to take a little of my blue and just tone it a bit with my black. I don’t want a lot of black in it because I want it to still be sort of distinctly blue. Glazing liquid right now is really useful. But you could dry brush this and I just like my shadows to be somewhat translucent. And I’m going to come over here and I’m gonna paint inside the lines, very carefully, my blue shadow. Alright. See that? I’m just following the lines that I sketched in with my charcoal pencil. Do you have a boo-boo? You can always paint it out with the background snow color. Now I’m leaving my sliver here. I can define that in a minute when I’m doing my sunbeams. Really drama-ed it up! So you can see that the shadow slightly translucent. I’m just following my lines as much as I can. The closer you follow them, the more considered the piece will look. There we go. Alright. There we are. So there’s that tree. Painting up to this tree. Using the edge of my brush and just dusting that in. See, I’m just painting it in. Painting it in. Get some more. Coming here. I’m just painting it in. See, even this is just like a dry brush. You’re just casting a shadow. I’m gonna darken the shadow at the base of the trees in a minute. But right now I just want to get it laid in. Just wanna get it laid in. Get blue. Alright. So I’ve got this coming up and back here. I’m gonna make sure I lay that in. Painting around my trees. And you can see how suddenly this staggered shadow makes a little sense, doesn’t it? When your brain starts to just really really like what’s happening. So I’m gonna paint this guy’s shadow. Gonna paint it in. A nice shadow. Offloading all that pigment right onto my canvas. Let’s do that. Right. Now one thing that I can do is I can take a little black and a little blue. I want it to be a little more blue than black. Then I can come right here at the base of the trees and sometimes I like to pull out just a little slightly heavier shadow a little bit. See? Just a little bit around the canvas. Not all the way back. Just a little bit. I think that helps a little bit. A little bit, little bit, little bit. And all I have left is to put a little sunlight. You can see I just used that extra shadow. Just to even create more white, and more depth in my trees. I’m going to really really rinse out and I’m going to get a little of my yellow. See? I might need to wipe off on my paper towel. I just don’t want that much water. It wants to be sort of a dry brush. I’m gonna get my white paint. I’m gonna come here and I’m gonna pull down. A little more sunlight. Right here. Look at that sunlight go. Just a little bit. Dry brush. A lot of the canvas is showing through. Follow this. Just pulling a little bit of that out just to add a little dramatization to what’s happening. More white if you need it. Just pull this little bit of white here. I’m really following all the lines that I’ve laid in to get that, aren’t I? Come right here. Just dusting this drama drama drama. Dry brush, dry brush, dry brush. You could do this with a glaze too. I’m just trying to create that sense that things are very very dramatic. You can even tap between this tree. Show the sunlight beams are that reflected. I’m gonna add a little.. A little bit on here into the distance where I’m thinking I need it. If you need it, add it. If you don’t, don’t. Just look to see where you might need it. I’m gonna get a little more of my yellow on the tip here and then I’m gonna… Just come right through the center. Look at this. Kind of making a little starburst right here. Look at that. Look at that. Be real careful that you’re keeping those lines straight. This helps define that vanishing point for the shadows. Shadow’s vanishing points are always related to the sun. So showing it really really helps define it. Isn’t that fun? Oh my gosh! It’s so fun. Oh my gosh! It’s so fun. Are you kind of like really excited? Now, this is a great time to look at your piece. Determine do I want to like lightness? Do I want a brightness? One thing that you could do before we sign is you could take this brush. I really like the glow but you can come in. This is just an extra little thing. Come here. Just add a little white into that starburst. Right over the top. Just a little extra touch. Just if you can. Just if you can. Just dramatize that not. See how it’s looking? (gasps) Oh doesn’t it feel like- Like it’s just that moment where the sun is caught your eye and you’re just feeling your heart in your chest and it just is amazing. The possibilities the day are just right there. I hope the possibilities of your painting are like that for you right now. They’re just like a bright sunrise breaking open and you’re just like wow this art thing is pretty cool. I should do more of that. I really love spending the day with you. I think we should sign our paintings. If you’re feeling good about where your painting is, you should sign it. I feel good about where my painting is. I think a better find my signature brush. I like to have a little signature brush around. I’m going to use white today. I think because it’s going to be very mellow. And I’m just going to come here. I’m gonna actually follow this sunbeam. Put this little signature in. You’re sort of, close out my creative time, right. That’s what we’re doing here. When we sign we close out our creative time. I really enjoyed spending the day with you. See, that’s fun putting that on the angle like that. Just hitting there. Like a little extra little cookie in the painting. You can do that with your signatures. They don’t have to be (growls). They can be integrated or kind of cookie it in. It’s sort of a fun thing. Always be optimistic. Always… Always be at that moment of the dawn. I love painting with you want. You want to know more about this or anything else I’m doing creatively, you can go check out the Art Sherpa dot com. I mean other people like you who are beginning their journey. Share your art. Have a lot of fun. You can find us on social media. We’re on Pinterest and Twitter and Instagram and Facebook. All kinds of exciting stuff happening. Take care of yourselves. Be good. Be happy. I’m having a little hat moment and I want to see you at the easel really soon. Bye bye! (closing music begins)

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