LUNCH DOODLES with Mo Willems! Episode 08

LUNCH DOODLES with Mo Willems! Episode 08


– Today is Wednesday, March 25th. And welcome back to Mo’s Lunch Doodles. Thank you for coming. Hope that you had fun
dressing up yesterday. I had fun. All right, let’s see, before we get going what I can do with this. Wow, I don’t know. I’m not really able to see much today. Oh, here we go, maybe. Maybe do this. Go like that. Let’s see. I’m doing a thing. I usually do creatures or
characters, but this is a thing. It’s flower in a flower vase, right? Yeah. Here’s the thing about doodles. They don’t always work out. That’s okay. Sometimes you make a
drawing that just isn’t what you hoped it would be. And you’re happy that you at least got to make some doodling. And maybe next time it will go better. Welcome, again. I’m excited to be here. I’m gonna go straight to questions because we got really
something exciting to do today. And I wanna kind of get to it. So first, let’s do our questions. “Did you ever get in trouble
at school for doodling,” asks Katie who is seven. Yes, I sometimes did. You know, sometimes, some of my teachers didn’t think I was paying attention because I would sit there and doodle while I was listening to
what the teachers had to say. But I was paying attention. Julia, from South Korea. Hello, Julia from South Korea. “How old is the pigeon?” I got a similar question
a couple of days ago about Elephant and Piggie. I think, again, the pigeon, probably, he’s not old enough
for a driver’s license, so I’m not sure how old he is. It’s a good question. And I also don’t know
what pigeon years are. I can tell you how long
he’s been published. Very soon, on April
1st, it will be 18 years since the pigeon was first published. That’s a long time ago. Orrin, who’s four, says, “What
does Mo Willems do all day?” This, and it’s great. “What do you do when you
get frustrated,” asks Liam. Well, I do a lot of different
things when I get frustrated. Sometimes I get angry. Sometimes I’m a little bit too loud. Sometimes I get really sad. But what I’ve found is very helpful is to sit and make doodles,
even if they don’t work out. And to take the time. And if I ever said anything or do anything that I’m not proud of, to
make sure that I apologize to the people around me, and say, “I’m sorry that I got a little angry.” Or “I’m sorry that I acted
sad,” or something like that. That’s what I do. “I want to know where the pigeon lives. “Does he have a house
or a nest?” asks Aiden. I don’t know. And I did that on purpose. You’ll notice that a lot of my books I don’t draw the backgrounds. Because the less that I put in, the more that you put in, right? So, does the pigeon live in
the city or in the country? That’s up to you. You get to decide. I want you to do 51% of
the work because I’m lazy. “How did you make the stars “at the end of your book
called ‘Waiting is Not Easy’?” asks Sophia, who is eight years old. That is a very good question. I did a combination of
drawing them and doing them on the computer and cutting
out various photographs. And that image of all those
stars took a long time. What I wanted to do was really important, was to make those stars
look and feel realistic, like real stars, but still
live in the cartoony world of Elephant and Piggie. So that was a very important
image for me to create. That is good. Here we go. Alena says, “Which of
your characters would be “the most fun to go to
the playground with?” That is a very good question. I know that Cat the cat likes to play in the playground a lot, so Cat the cat is probably an expert in terms of the playground. If the playground had a hotdog
salesman anywhere near it, the pigeon would probably
wanna be there, too. And then Ethan asks, “Do
you know any magic tricks?” Ethan, I have one magic trick. If I snap my finger, I can travel all the way across the country to a friend of mine who knows how to draw, and learn about drawing from that friend. Would you like to see
my try this magic trick? Ready? Here I go. I’m gonna snap. And I hope we go. And I sure hope we see
my friend, Dan Santat. – How did you get in my house? You have a pretty nice place, too. What day is today? March 25th, 2020. That’s today. I’m supposed to do a lunch
doodle with Mo today. Oh, is that today? I heard a million kids watch that. A million kids. Excuse me one second. Children terrify me. Oh, you’re still here. Well, um… I’m Dan Santat. I live in a magical land
known as Los Angeles. – [Children] Wow. – This is my, get that outta there. Get out of there, out. This is my personal assistant, Bill. Say hi, Bill. – Hi, Bill. Don’t mind me, I’m just an intern. – And I’m like Mo. I make books just like Mo does. Here are some books that I’ve done. My friend Mo and I, we did
this book together called “Harold & Hog Pretend For Real”. My friend Mo and I, we did
this book together called “The Cookie Fiasco”. I also write my own books. This is a book that I wrote
and illustrated called “After the Fall”. Now this is a book that I
just drew the pictures for, but I didn’t write. It was written by a good friend of mine. His name is Minh Le. And it’s called “Lift”. This book’s not even out yet. It comes out in May. And I’m actually best known,
best known for this book. This one’s called “The
Adventures of Beekle”. Now, it won this really great award called the Caldecott Medal. And usually, you would see
a nice shiny gold sticker around this man’s legs here on the cover. But I wanna show you something. I want you to take a
good look at that cover. And I want you to take a
good look at that man’s legs because now, when you see
this book, there’ll be a shiny gold sticker on the front of it and you’ll never see
those man’s legs again. So burn it into your memory. And when you see your
friends, someday they’ll ask, “I wonder what’s behind
that shiny gold sticker.” And you can say, “I’ve seen those legs. “They’re there and they’re glorious.” I actually don’t own a copy of this book with the gold sticker on it. So, that’s kind of embarrassing. I wonder, I wonder if I could show you what the actual Caldecott
Medal looks like. I don’t know where, oh, here it is. See this? That is the Caldecott Medal. Now, most of you have seen the front of the Caldecott Medal. You’ve seen this cool little sticker that shows the front of it. And it has this cool
little etching of a guy riding on a horse. But you probably have never seen the back of the Caldecott Medal. Let me show you what the back looks like. See, now that’s the back
of the Caldecott Medal. And it has this cool
little etching of a guy, I don’t know, playing air guitar. And there’s all this writing on it. I’ve had this thing for five years. I’ve never even had a chance to read it. I think it says if lost, please return to Dan Santat in Los Angeles, California. That’s a Caldecott Medal. (dogs barking) SO, I’m supposed to talk for 20 minutes, and I don’t know what I’m
gonna talk to you about. That’s a long time. I find that terrifying. Excuse me, excuse me just one minute. I won’t let you down. You’re still here. Well, first of all, maybe I should get dressed first. Maybe I’ll draw for you. Hold on, hold on right there. Let me get in some of my drawing clothes. This will be fantastic. You stay right there, okay? I’ll be right back. You stay right there. Hi, I’m back. I hope I didn’t make you wait too long. I had to get in my work clothes, where I spend all my time drawing. What was that? Oh, this, this old thing? I wear this every day when I work making children’s books for kids. So, let’s, let’s start with
our drawing pad of paper. And we’ll get something to draw with. I think I have something here. That’s not a pen. This is a pen. Now, I think I’m gonna
give you a drawing lesson. And I’ll show you how to
draw anything in the universe just using three basic shapes. The first shape will be the circle. Now let’s start with the circle. A big part of art is that you
have to use your imagination to fill in the blanks. Now, with a circle, I could, I could make myself a ball. Or I could draw a circle. And we could make a delicious lollipop. Man, you would think after
making art for 40 years that I’d be better at this. Or maybe, maybe I draw a bunch of circles. And now, I’ve made myself a cluster of grapes. What I wouldn’t do for
a nice grape right now. The second shape is a triangle. Now, with a triangle, you can do other fun things. If I took this triangle right here, I I just drew myself a tortilla chip. So, I guess I don’t have to
do anything else to this. You know, if you’re really hungry, you could just add a line there. And now it’s a delicious
slice of cheese pizza. But if you don’t like cheese pizza, you could add some circles to that. And now, you’ve got pepperoni pizza. A triangle could also be a gnome hat. Draw two eyes. The nose. And some ears. The third shape is a square. Now there’s endless
possibilities for a square. It’s much more versatile
than even a circle or a triangle, I would think. I just drew you a box. That was easy, right? Maybe I just drew you the state of Colorado. Magical. I could draw you a box. And now I just drew you a
slice of cheddar cheese. But maybe you don’t like cheddar cheese. Maybe you want to add some circles, you want to make some Swiss cheese. Oh, Swiss cheese, Swiss
cheese is delicious. But maybe, oh, I have an idea. Maybe if I took this, the Swiss cheese, and I added two eyes. And some eyelashes. And a nose. And a mouth. And two square teeth. I now just drew you
this copyrighted figure. That’s what you can do with a square. Now, let’s draw an author. Is there any authors around here? Oh, you mean me. Here, I’ll make it a
little easier for you. I’m gonna take off my glasses. And we’re gonna draw an author. Now, the shape of an author’s
head is a circle, right? Really easy. Now, an author has two eyes. Those eyes are shaped like circles. And an author has two
pupils in those eyes. And those are circles as well. This author looks terrified. My mother’s eyes. Authors have noses. Authors have a triangle nose. My father’s nose. Authors have ears. It’s my father’s ears. Does an author have hair? No. But this author has some hair. He has eyebrows. My mother’s eyebrows. And lastly, an author has a mouth. I’m sad to say that that’s a pretty spot on caricature of myself. Get, get out of here. So different artists have
different ways of drawing things. You just drew a portrait of myself. My friend Kadir Nelson,
who won the Caldecott Medal this year, painted this portrait of me. It only took him one hour. That’s amazing. We’re both good friends of Mo. I’ll show you how I draw
Elephant and Piggie. So when I was a kid, I
taught myself how to draw using drawing books but mostly practice. And it started out by copying pictures of things that I liked, like
Garfield and Calvin & Hobbes. And eventually I copied
those things so many times that I memorized how to do it. And eventually I could draw Garfield and all those favorite
characters that I love without even having to look at a picture. And that’s kind of how drawing is. It’s just practice and
practice and, you know, it’s like riding a bicycle. I think some people
think you have to be born with this talent to draw. And that’s not actually true. You know, like if you
were to ride a bicycle. You weren’t born with the ability to draw, yet you worked at it. You learned how to balance. And you learned how to pedal. And then before you knew it,
you were riding a bicycle. Same thing with drawing. It’s just being able to practice at things that you’re not very good at. And then eventually, they
just become second nature. And I’ve been at this
for about 45 years now. And now, I think I can draw
about anything I’d like. Some things are a little bit
more difficult than others, but in the end, you create
the style that you like. And this is how I create
Elephant and Piggie. I think I’ll do one more drawing. And I’ll draw, I’ll draw my friend Beekle. So for those of you who
aren’t familiar with my work, Beekle is a character. He’s an imaginary friend. But the thing about
him in my story is that he’s an imaginary friend who
hasn’t been imagined yet. He’s waiting for a child to imagine him. And so, he gets tired of waiting. And he’s on this island with all these other imaginary friends. And they’re all waiting to
be imagined by children. And he builds a boat. And he goes to the real world to find a child to be friends with. And the story was inspired by the birth of my son. I have two boys. They are 14 and 11. And there comes a point in a person’s life when they decide they
wanna start a family. And sometimes, as a parent,
maybe even like your parents, it can be terrifying, the thought of having to take care of a little one. And so the story about
Beekle, is the story about finding your first friend, or meeting someone for the first time, that you didn’t realize
you were going to love for the rest of your life. I don’t know if I’m gonna do more books about Beekle in the future, but I think it would be fun. In the meantime, I’m
writing other picture books. Telling different stories
in different mediums. I’m working on a graphic
novel right now, my second. I’m doing other picture books, illustrating other picture
books for other authors as well. I’m constantly working. Every year, I probably do on average maybe I don’t know, five books a year. Used to be a lot more, but
I’ve slowed down quite a bit. And, I think we’re done. This is our friend Beekle. (bell ringing)
Wait, what’s that sound mean? What’s that sound mean? I did it, 20 minutes? I did it. – [Children] Yay. – Oh, gosh, we did it, that’s fantastic. 20 minutes with kids. I don’t know about you,
but I had a lot of fun. Thanks so much. Well, I better get going. I need to go wash my hands. And then hug my family. And then go wash my hands again. That’s a busy schedule. I wanna thank you again for coming out. I hope you have a great rest of your day. And be brave, be smart, and keep drawing. Hey, Bill, can you clean
this up while I’m gone? Thanks. Bye. – Look at this mess. There’s confetti everywhere. I don’t get paid enough to clean up after this guy all the time. Have a good day everybody. – That was great. Thank you, Dan. I learned so much from you. You know, I’ve had a lot of
fun with Dan over the years. We’ve been friends for years and years. And Dan helped me make these two books. These are the Elephant &
Piggie Like Reading books. He did the very first
one, “The Cookie Fiasco”, which was probably the first
book I’ve ever seen for kids with the word fiasco in
it as an early reader. And then this is just
the weirdest book ever, “Harold & Hog Pretend For Real”. I love both these books. I’m gonna end, I’m gonna write Dan a thank-you note. And maybe you can write a thank-you note to somebody who’s far away
who’s been nice to you. And you can send that to them. And you can also show them some
of the skills that you have. Like Dan showed me stuff
that I don’t know how to do. Maybe you can show this friend of yours. I’m gonna write a very simple letter. It just says thank you. I’m gonna do that in blue, Thank Dan. Then I’m gonna say, You. And have the pigeon saying that. The pigeon likes Dan also. Write my name. And then I’ll say, it’s the 25th. So that he knows. Thank you Dan. And also thank you for joining me today. And I hope to see you tomorrow for Mo’s Lunch Doodles.

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