GBAPSD Board of Education Meeting: November 5, 2018

GBAPSD Board of Education Meeting: November 5, 2018


♪♪ANNOUNCER: The views and
opinions in this program are not
those of CESA 7 or Spectrum.♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ ♪♪ (indistinct chatter) (indistinct chatter) BRENDA: I’d like to call
the board meeting to order. And just for benefit of members
of the public we want to you to know that you can view the board
agenda and handouts as well as minutes from past meetings by
visiting the district website at www.GBAPSD.org. Click on our district at the top
and then Board of Education on the left. And then on the next menu on
the left you will find a link to agendas and minutes. This will link will take you to
a website called Neptune where all board agendas, minutes, and
handouts from boarded meetings are housed. We also, tonight, will provide
our community with two different opportunities during our meeting
to speak before the board. All speakers must fill out a
form indicating their desire to speak. If you wish to speak during
tonight’s open forum you may do so with respect to items that
are posted on tonight’s agenda or any other matter you
wish to share with the board. Please note that Wisconsin’s
open meeting laws prohibit the board from conducting business
on matters brought during this open forum. The board also will permit
public participation during agenda items that the Board of
Education will be voting on as noted on our agenda. During this public participation
time consistent with state and federal laws, board members
may engage in dialogue with the speakers. In order that all voices are
heard the board will suspend engagement until all speakers
of had a chance to speak. Please keep your
comments to five minutes, the timekeeper will let you know
when you’re five minutes has ended. Prior to starting your comments,
please provide your name and address. Lastly, demonstrations during
public comment such as clapping or cheering, in response to
either public comments or statements made by board
members are prohibited. At this point, I have indication
from one person that they would like to speak before
the board tonight. And so I’ll call him up. Rob Miller. And Rob, if you will at
that podium over there, right, Jeff? Is that where you
want them, yeah, okay. Oh, you need the
wearable mic, yeah. ROB: Hello? It’s not… BRENDA: Is it? KATIE: He’ll turn it up. BRENDA: Oh, he
has to turn it on, yeah. ROB: Hello, okay. Thank you. My name is Rob Miller. I live at 131 S. Van Buren
Street in Green Bay and I basically wanted to address
a couple of procedural suggestions based on
my dealings with the school board over the last–I
don’t know–year and a half. So I’m going to give you a
couple of examples and then present my observations
based on those examples. Example 1 is the
so-called engagement session, what I term a meeting with
regard to student achievement held at West High School
maybe about a year ago. And there we had, I don’t
know, six or seven school board members with their
backs to the audience. Were lectured at
for about an hour. And I actually submitted about
a three-page observations and about 15 pages of documentation
which were never addressed at the meeting, although Dr.
Langenfeld did subsequently. What I’m suggesting is
that having the school board, or any local
government, basically, doing imitation of potted
plants is not the way to conduct government business. The school board,
as I envision it, should be engaged
with his constituents. They are the decision-makers,
the policymakers of this enterprise, and they should
be willing to talk to the constituents about the very
subject matter under discussion and there are very few issues
that are more important in this area then, you know, the
issue of student achievement. So my suggestion, the bottom
line suggestion is we need more interaction between the school
board and its constituents. In this case, the meeting was
presumably properly noticed as a meeting. There is no legal impediment
to the board speaking to the constituents. And it’s not the role of the
staff to basically speak on behalf of the board. The members of the board
should speak directly to their constituents. We are not supplicants. We need not beg to talk to the
body corporate that rules this district. We are not subjects. We don’t have to kneel to get
some time to talk to the body corporate. And I distinguish this between
individual board members, or even staff members who are
freely and readily available and the actual decision-making that
makes–that’s occurring in the dynamic of a group meeting. And when I talk about
the body corporate, I’m talking about the
board meeting as a whole. And that’s a different dynamic
than somebody who might I call up and speak to for
five minutes or so. The second example
is the Noah plan, the so-called alternative plan
that was submitted by me as the editor, and is actually some
ideas by some former teachers. That had a hearing and we
were politely heard out. And then it just
went into the ether. There weren’t really much
in the way of objections. I think it was
dead any scrutiny. And I don’t have any problem
with it being voted up or down. I just think it
would be appropriate, as every other local
government body would do, to have the committee vote it
up or down and have the school board vote it up or down. And if I’m given a chance and
the other people are given a chance to be
heard and we go down, and if it’s defeated,
that’s all we can ask. But when we put in a lot of time
and there’s a lot of time that was put into that plan, and
nothing happens on a very urgent issue on the destiny and future
of Washington Middle School, that’s very disturbing. I don’t have any
problem, in as I said, going down on a vote when
I have a chance to speak. My problem is that we’re
not getting that chance. I mean, and I’ll quote John
Stuart Mill who said that all silencing of discussion is an
assumption of unavailability. And I think the board
is silencing discussion. You want the flip
side of the same idea, the marketplace of ideas
to this board is clogged, if not constricted. And as I said, this is totally
unlike with the county board would do, with the
City Council would do, or what other suburban
local governments would do. So, I
respectfully made my points, I have not yielded or put
forward any invectives or insults. I think you should consider my
suggestions and I making them at the request of a
couple of board members, thank you. BRENDA: Thank you, Rob. Is there anyone else who would
like to speak for the board this evening? Seeing none, then then
we will start our agenda. First, I would like to state
like we have all several board members present tonight. We are joined at the table
by Dr. Michelle Langenfeld, to my immediate left. We have members of the
superintendent’s cabinet around the table, and two Intercity
Student Council members, Jamie Barbio, Barbian, sorry. Who is president of the project
intercity Student Council from West High School. And Camden Czarnecki
from Southwest High School. Welcome, Camden. Feel free to raise your hand
and ask questions and give your input if you have
something you’d like to say. So at this, I would–we would
begin our teaching and learning work session and that will be
facilitated by Katie Maloney. KATIE: Thank you, Brenda. We have several discussion items
this evening and the first will be an update from American
Institutes for Research and the work at
Washington Middle School. MICHELLE: As they come to the
table I know that the associate Superintendent John Megas in the
team have been working very hard and he’ll introduce you to our
guest here tonight who are part of the team in part of that
transformational effort at Washington Middle School. It is around
continuous learning, both together, and I think
tonight is an opportunity for all of us to learn all of the
work that’s been going on at Washington and obviously just
beginning the work and being able to move forward working
in partnership to transform our skills in the tools that we
currently have in our toolbox, all based on the
board’s strategic roadmap, aclear vision, a clear mission,
and various efforts around accountability that will
be shared as well in the presentation. So I will turn it over to you,
Mr. Megas and thank you for a your work. And thank you to the board for
the opportunity to have this investment in Washington Middle
School and to be able to provide this important update. JOHN: Sure, thank you for having
us tonight and I’d like to start off by introducing the
team of people before you. We have Dr. Judy
Weigandt, Cindy Olson, Tag Johnston, and Cindy Barber. Catherine, sorry. We have Cindy. I’d like if you could just
briefly introduce yourself. JUDY: Sure. Judy Weigandt, Executive
Director of Secondary and I worked very closely
with eight of our schools, for middle schools
and for high schools, and has been quite
a great pleasure, actually, to do this work with
Washington Middle School with Cindy as well is the AIR team. CINDY: Hello,
everyone, I’m Cindy Olson, and the principal at
Washington Middle School. And again, I would echo what
Judy said about working with AIR and the
partnership that we have. Some great things are happening. TAG: And I’m Tag Johnston. I’ve been at AIR now for
five years and I specialize in turnaround coaching
for math content. I’ve worked in Virginia and New
York and a little bit in Rhode Island and really glad to be
with the Washington Middle School team in Green Bay. CATHERINE: Good
evening, I’m Catherine Barber, and I’m the managing director of
the district improvement center at AIR. I’m a former turnaround
principal and have successfully turned around the
school in urban, suburban, and rural. And have her earned a credential
as school turnaround specialist at the Darden Curry Partnership
for educational leaders. And happy to be here
tonight to support the team. JOHN: Excellent. And so, we waned to bring
this first report to you, the September
report, with some context. And that’s part of the part of
the reason why we wanted this is part of a work session so that
we can gain feedback from the board on the reporting
process, the metrics, and then bring that information
back in our November 19 meeting, our regular board meeting, as
well as bring the October report which would be finished by
that time and ready to share. So really that is our intention. Again, we wanted to make sure
that there’s a clear context to the work because just a
report without explanation, something that we wanted to make
sure that we shared in depth. Again, will be
facilitating information, discussing the steps
that we’ve taken thus far. But we also wanted to share a
draft of our success metrics because it’s really important
that we define what it is that we’re going to measure, how is
it that were going to see if Washington is successful? And it is important that we have
agreed-upon criteria for that success. Because if we don’t
have agreed-upon criteria, that’s something that can
be loose and ill-defined. So will go in
greater depth with that. We also want to make sure
that we have this work session opportunity to take your
input on those metrics. So, if there’s
something that were missing, something that the board
feels critical that we monitor, that were able to consider that
and include that in our final draft of our metrics. And again, we want on making
sure all the information and all the documents shared tonight
and those that are shared in the November 19 meeting, that those
are shared publicly as well, that we were preparing the
work throughout the weekend and throughout the day and making
sure that it is this timely as possible is important, but
really it is about the context of being able to receive input
from the board on this work, on the communication plan, and
on the metrics so that we can make sure that they’re shared
effectively in the future. Thank you. So, you have a paper copy of the
presentation with a sent link to reports in front of you. BRENDA: We also have the
PowerPoint available to us in our email. JOHN: Yes, and we shared the
PowerPoint this afternoon. And we have a mouse
that is not working. Sorry, thank you. Hope this one reaches. All right, so why are we here? We’re here to provide the board
with an update of the measures of success and plan next
steps for partnership between Washington Middle School,
AIR, and the district as we move forward. Catherine? CATHERINE: Thanks, John. Just for those of
you, just as a reminder, Tag and I do work for American
Institutes for Research. As you may have heard us
refer to ourselves as AIR, A-I-R, the organization is a
nonprofit and we’re really focused on improving
the outcomes for those, especially for those
that are disadvantaged. Are you… JOHN: I can. KATIE: Excuse me, Catherine. Can everyone hear in the back? Okay, good. Thank you, I just
wanted to double check. CATHERINE: As I said
in the introduction, and the managing director
for the district and school improvement center
that is a part of AIR. And we are focused on
school improvement efforts, specifically building
systems and capacity builders. So we focus on providing
customized solutions that are specific to the local context
that improve student outcomes. So, we deliver high
quality services, we meet client’s needs, and then
were really focused on system building capacity building
to improve the outcomes for students. As Tag said, we’ve been a lead
turnaround partner in multiple states. We provided support to
over 40 districts for, over 800 student outcomes,
and have had some really good results with improving schools
and outcomes for students. Our work is based and
grounded in research. We are a research and
application organization. Our school improvement framework
is based on what we call these gears that you’re looking at. And you can see that in the
upper left-hand corner that leadership that drives
change is the biggest care. And that’s where we do put
the most of our emphasis is on supporting and coaching the
principal or the leader at the school that drives the
improvement efforts and then that in turn, turns all of those
improvement elements that you see there. I think one of the most
important things here is to think about school turnaround,
school improvement as a pathway, and we develop this improvement
pathway based on implementation science and the
phases of implementation. And so, what we have found in
our school improvement efforts is that many people jump in at
the end of what we will call our pathway where they are
talking about sustainability and innovation without having done
the proper work at the front end on the reflecting and the
preparing for the school improvement effort. Washington Middle School
participated in a very intensive needs assessment process, which
is preparing and reflection part of it, and then in
turn, developed a plan. And now that Washington
Middle is in the launch phase. So they have a really well
thought out plan based on the outcomes of the needs assessment
and they’re at the point where they’re implementing
their improvement efforts. That then in turn, leads us
into what we call the continuous improvement cycle, which is
where they’ll talk about it some more tonight further
in the presentation, collecting data,
monitoring that data, then in turn to identify
supports for the teachers, the principal and then make
adjustments along the way. As we go through multiple cycles
of the continuous improvement cycle throughout this year,
ultimately we’re all leading and aimed at sustainability, which
then in turn can spur you off into innovation. We like to show the slide
because every system is perfectly designed to
get the results it gets. So when we think about
Washington Middle School, we think about the
needs assessment. The needs assessment helped
us to identify why people keep driving around, if can’t see at
there’s a bar there across that road there, helped us identify
why we keep driving around the bar and not address the bar
in the middle of the road. So, through that needs
assessment it really helps Cindy and the team develop their
school improvement plan, in the specific initiatives that
they’re going to implement to improve the
outcomes for students. This is a
partnership, so it’s AIR, then the team composed of
Ted, Doug Fireside is ELA coach, Donna with them, is
leadership coach. It’s in AIR partnership working
with Cindy and her team at Washington Middle School,
and working with the district support team as well. So, this really is the three
legs of the school–of a stool that are working altogether to
address the needs at school. So it shared accountability, and
we’ll also celebrate the quick wins and we’ll all celebrate
the outcomes and the end of the year, too, as well. JOHN: And if there are
questions all along the way, feel free to ask as
well, or comments. KATIE: Rhonda? RHONDA: Okay, I have a
few questions in general. When you reference the image
on the bar in the middle of the road, how do you
determine what the bar is? CATHERINE: It’s based on
the outcomes of the needs assessment. RHONDA: Okay. So the needs assessment
actually happen, right? CATHERINE: Uh-huh. RHONDA: Okay, so how we
determine–isn’t determining what the bar is first and
then rolling out the plan? Or have we determined the bar
and we’re rolling out a plan, hoping to figure
out what the bar is? CINDY: Want me to answer? JOHN: If you could
ask the question again. RHONDA: Yep. JOHN: And you answer, but
I’d like to hear the question. RHONDA: No,
actually like the image. I actually think it’s very
interesting image and I think it tells a story. But I just want to make sure I
understand are we looking to figure out what the bar is, do
we know if the bar is from a needs assessment and them
rolling in a plan based on what that bar is? CINDY: We determine what
the bar is based on the needs assessment, and the needs
assessment was done in this summer during the
co-interpretation process. So the bar is
instruction, assessment, and relationship. So those three categories and
we’ll talk more in depth about the metrics that were using
within those the categories. RHONDA: Thank you, I just wanted
to make sure I understood what the bar was. JOHN: And I would say as
well the defining of the bar, the initial work that we do
around co-interpretation gives us a deep perspective as
to what the problem is, but it’s an ongoing process as
we go through cycles of inquiry to further define the problem. If we’re deciding our
approach is to go under the bar, then we have to do deeper
assessment of what is the height of the bar, what is
the strength of the bar? So, as we go deeper, we continue
to define and better define the issue. RHONDA: Just one more question,
when you say assessment, what do you
actually mean by that? CINDY: So it’s an assessment
that’s done in the classroom, common assessments
that teachers use. Then our benchmark assessments
that are done throughout the school year, this star
assessment is what we use. We do that three times a year. Then the lagging indicator would
be our success on the Wisconsin Forward Exam, which is
given in the spring. And then we unfortunately
don’t get those results until September, sometimes October. So, that would be the ultimate
metric that were using as well. That’s under assessment. KATIE: Any other questions? CATHERINE: So, the support that
AIR is providing with Cindy at Washington Middle School comes
in three different work streams. So the first one is around
turnaround leadership coaching. So, Cindy has a former
turnaround principal assigned to her, Donna Wortham, who
unfortunately had to be in another state today where we
would’ve had her white here with you tonight. So, Donna comes a couple times a
month to do shoulder to shoulder coaching, actually
walks with Cindy, works with Cindy, and does
classroom observations and reviews data, problem-solving,
thought partnership, job-embedded
professional learning, and in between those visits they
are also to support Cindy with virtual support, too. Which could be conference calls
or they can Skype each other. That turnaround leadership
coaching is a competency-based coaching approach, which means
that it is based on what we know successful turnaround leaders
do and think to lead a school improvement effort at a school. And so, this is based again
on research and evidence. And Cindy participated in
a self-assessment on the competencies, set
a coaching goal, and that is what Donna and Cindy
work on every time that Donna is here. Once those coaching
goals are accomplished, they go back and
revisit, reset a goal, and then that work continues on. Do you want to add
anything to that? CINDY: No. CATHERINE: Okay, all right. JOHN: Actually I
will add something. I think sometimes we have
question around what does that mean to have coaching? What do we need coaches? What a strange term. But in a city like Green Bay
where we have a variety of coaching needs, we
have specialized coaches. It’s one thing to be
a football coach, but it’s another thing to have
specific expertise in being able to give key in the input
and indicators to a specific position. And while we have our executive
directors who are highly skilled we want to make sure that we’re
getting the absolute best advice on turnaround processes and
coaching related to leadership and turnaround. Later in the presentation we
also talk about how this is not meant just as an effort
to turn around Washington, but it’s an accelerator
for the system as a whole. Because we see
what is occurring, we see the practices, we build
upon those practices in other schools and we take them
and share them elsewhere. We’ll go more deeply into
that as we proceed through. CATHERINE: So, is a
former turnaround principal, I participated in two years of
training at the University of Virginia and had a coach
assigned to me the whole entire time. I could not have imagined
having led the turnaround effort without a coach. And it is someone who is
highly skilled in understanding organizational change process,
but it’s also someone that helps you navigate through a very
complex and complicated world as well. We come from a coaching model
that we believe that everyone can benefit from the coach and
everyone can get better at their job. Even high senior level
executives at AIR have senior-level coaches. So that they can be better and
be the very best at the jobs that they fulfill. So, we have found tremendous
amount of success when folks have a coach and are able
to benefit and receive that coaching. It’s also, it’s a neutral person
that comes in with a fresh pair of eyes, too, as well. Same thing for
instructional coaching, again, building the capacity of
the teachers and support staff at the school to be able to
implement new practices and to have support while they’re
learning how to do new things. It’s really important to be
able to have that support. Again, we learn from doing this
work in multiple schools across multiple years that the shoulder
to shoulder pieces the most critical part in getting adults
to learn how to adopt a new practice. So, that’s working
right there beside them. Tag is one of the
best at doing this, too, as well. So he were shoulder to
shoulder with teachers, he models lessons for
teachers, he co-plans, he co-teaches, he demonstrates
with the whole goal working towards the teacher being
able to do all of these things independently by him or herself,
but in the very beginning of someone is learning
how to do something new, it’s really helpful to have that
coach there right beside you that says yes, you’ve
got it, you got this part. Let’s just work on this
part a little bit here. So the extra support has been of
tremendous value to teachers and we’ve always heard back
from teachers that they really benefited from the coaching. And Tag will talk a
little bit more about that. So, Tag, and Doug Fireside
provide ELA and math coaching, shoulder to shoulder,
also provide professional development, targeted to provide
specifically the teachers needs at Washington Middle School and
then have virtual supportive in between. So phone calls, emails, or
Skyping and with teachers in between visits as well. And then because we are a large
research organization and we have lots of resources, Tag and
Doug have tons of sources at the resources at their fingertips
that they can share with with teachers in
between visits as well. TAG: Right, I mention just
a couple of little things. One of the bullets on this
particular slide talks about the October professional learning. We did a session on math focus
in a session with literacy focus as we moved along. But really, the key is
that we’ve done professional development for years. One of the things about coaching
is that if you do professional development and then follow up
on that professional development coaching, that’s where you get
real gains because the teacher can try it, someone can watch,
someone can talk with her about it, are the teacher and say I
would like to see what it looks like and then we can let
them know what it looks like. So, the key is this not
just professional development, oh it’s really exciting, but
three days later it’s gone, we follow-up. The important thing is that
this is in partnership with the school in that wer’e focused on
the school goals and building off the work that’s done by
the administration team as we go along so that we’re talking
about the walk-through behaviors and helping teachers get better
on those rather than bringing Tag’s idea about what good
math teaching looks like. We’re all working together. And the virtual supports
been especially the ELA, Lori Langering, did I
save that close? Langering is the literacy coach
at Washington Middle School and has been really helpful in
consulting needs where Doug can meet by Skype with the team. And so, he’s got a
lot more horsepower. Because we’re only here
about once a month and we really depend on the virtual time to
keep in touch with the teachers and to take questions and to
look a plan for next step. So that’s a really important
piece to mention as well. KATIE: Ed? ED: Can you give us a couple
of examples of what are you coaching them to do? You mention new things. Give me some examples of what
you were asking to do for me. TAG: Okay, just a few
variety of examples. Right now one of the other
things that starts at the beginning is the adding and
subtracting positive numbers. And then going to
negative numbers in grade 7. And that’s a really difficult
concept for a lot of kids. And there are lots of physical
models that can be done with that. So the first visit I was here I
worked with seventh grade team to talk about here’s some
physical models for your kids who aren’t rule
followers in, you know, just changing to
subtraction flip, here’s why it works. We worked on that. So one way of coaching is
talking about here’s a different model to do it. Another part of coaching would
be let’s talk about how you’re managing independent
practice in your classroom. You know, how do
you organize things? So for example, one question we
talked about was an idea was for complicating computations,
give them the answer. So the job right now
isn’t to get the answer. The job is to learn how
to do the computation. So instead of having
everybody say to you hey, is this right, is this right? They know that. And they know it’s about
learning and about learning the methods so they can do that. Or it can be working with
teachers on different ways to present the proof of the
Pythagorean Theorem and one of the things were working on now
is formative assessment in the classroom, which is day to
day assessment to determine tomorrow’s lesson or maybe
parts of today’s lesson, where do I go next? So teachers are choosing a
technique that they want to get better at, and
we’re working on that. And I work on them to
plan what they’re doing. I’ll go into their classroom as
an observer to see how it looks and then I’m also there if they
want to talk about can I see you do it? So that’s what I do as a coach. Does that cover that
pretty well for you? JOHN: And I also things
important to point out, he pointed out to the degree
that it’s about making sure that were interfacing the
instructional coaching that AIR can provide with the
instructional coaching supports that we have in place already. So how can we take good practice
from AIR and share those somewhat limited time
opportunities and make sure that’s something that is spread
throughout our instructional coaches within Washington and
consider how it can be spread throughout the district as well. So it’s taking the
best, the best feedback, the best input for our
teachers and making sure that is replicated over time. KATIE: Kristina? KRISTINA: Go ahead
coming you and ask. RHONDA: Okay, so I just
have a question about that. And it sounds like great work. I wonder, though,
about your coaching, the shoulder to
shoulder coaching, and then let’s just say that
person decides to leave the district, the teacher who’s been
coached decides to leave the district. So what are we doing as a
district to retain the shoulder to shoulder coaching,
the extra, you know, the support that’s been given to
the teachers because as a board member my job is to make
sure that we have a return on investment in this process. And I’m wondering is it being
shared with the district so that we can actually retain what’s
happening and then we can apply it again? JOHN: Yes, and I would say
we try to–we don’t try, we do can guarantee the return
on investment by making sure that is collected and shared
with our teaching and learning department. We have ongoing structures for
communication there at the end and so, that’s one aspect. I think another return on
investment is people stay when they feel successful. If I’m in a position
where there’s struggle, I’m not sure what to do next,
and I’m not necessarily getting that feedback, that can lead to
feeling incredibly anxious about the work and frustrated
about not meeting student needs. And I think that sometimes
that’s a time when educators make a choice to go
to another building, or go to another
district or change profession. So in our strategical around
thriving workforce we talk about each member of our district
knowing not only with their job is, but having the tools and
knowledge to be successful in that job. So this is tailoring to
that need and giving very, very specific, high quality
feedback so that the people can feel successful and also create
assist of wanting to stay and wanting to continue. RHONDA: But if you, let’s just
say that doesn’t work out for maybe some other reason and
the teachers are gone and the principal is gone, do we have
some of this documented in the bank so that we have it to
access it when we need it? JOHN: Yes. RHONDA: Thank you. KRISTINA: So you talked about
partnership a couple of slides ago. I’m interested in how you
have connected with our diverse community in meaningful
and ongoing ways to form leadership opportunities. I think my concern with this
type of partnership with AIR and this is not
a personal concern, it’s a systems concern, is
that it feels very top-down, expert oriented, expert
driven, research is great, but our kids have a whole string
of needs that they bring in with them every single day. And it is critical that
we engage our community. We have experts in this
community who know our kids in know our communities. So I’m curious how you have
engaged them as part of the process is ongoing part of the
process and how that is part of the plan moving forward. CINDY: So that’s part of my work
and the shoulder to shoulder coaching that I’m doing with
Donna is connected to engagement in the community and I would
love for that to be our topic when I come back in two
weeks that we focus in on my leadership goals and the things
that are happening specifically to grow leadership practices at
Washington and how that falls in and fits in with what’s
happening to the community. KRISTINA: So is that not
part of what AIR is supporting? How does that work
divide, then, Cindy, can you… CINDY: I think it
absolutely does. I don’t have it up here
with me, it’s in my bag, but the assessment
tool that I did, the goals are
connected, and Catherine, I know you gonna know
it better than I do. And you might be able to speak
better to that part of it but my focus is on those high leverage
pack this is a school leader that can build that support
around Washington within the community because we’re not
going to have AIR supporting us forever. We need to figure some of this
out so that we can sustain it on our own in moving forward once
we get those foundational pieces in place. CATHERINE: So I’ll talk
a little bit about this. The turnaround leader
competencies are broken into four cluster areas. Again, this is research that
it’s not just come from the school education space, the
competencies actually came from the business world and
then to researchers, Emily and Brad Hassell, research
in the communication space and identified these
four clusters areas. One is driving for results,
which I think is very selt explanatory, is setting
targets, very–conducting custom observations, conducting
data, monitoring of progress, are we going where we
said we were gonna go, we implemented the things we
said we’re going to implement, how do we know that that’s a
whole continuous improvement piece? The second area is around
distributing the leadership in teacher leadership in developing
teacher leaders in the developing the teacher
leadership across the shoulders of the committee. This is one of the areas
that Cindy is working on, too, as well. The third area is around
personal effectiveness and relationships and this and
brings in the community piece to it, the different community
partnerships that can support the school including parents,
and then in other organizations, too, as well. And then the other one is
around problem solving, analytical thinking, again,
school improvement is a very complex, complicated process. Cindy, probably, I can imagine
how many problems Cindy solves in one day. As a former
turnaround principal, I remember thinking by 9:00, I
solved like a thousand problems from buses coming in on time and
do we have breakfast ready and do I have the kids in the
classroom ready and do I have enough of this and
that for the day? So when Cindy took
the self-assessment, she just assessed herself
on four cluster areas and identified a coaching goal
which includes addressing the community piece and
communication and involving others in school. So that will be the update that
you’ll receive in November along with updates on the
teacher leadership piece, too, as well. So it is a part of it. And for us it comes there in
the coaching of the principal in developing those
leadership competencies. KRISTINA: Thank you. JOHN: I think it’s also
important to note that we are keeping constant and open ear
and looking for various methods of making sure that were
listening to and reaching out to the first diverse
community members. When we did they, when we
started the co-interpretation process, we wanted to make sure
that we were inviting a broad group of people to get their
input so it wasn’t just a more homogenous group of teachers
and administrators giving input. We didn’t have as much success
during those focus groups as we had hoped despite some
explicit invitation. So we then took another step
and reached out there are family liaisons to provide
interpretation and interviews so that we were gaining input
from that perspective as well. It’s not just important, though,
that we do that in that first step. It’s something that needs to
be done on an ongoing basis and something that Cindy is
working into her working plans, because we can’t have better
relationships unless we have relationships with the community
and unless we change our culturally responsive practices
in serving all students. KRISTINA: John,
can add one thing? JOHN: Sure. KRISTINA: To go beyond that
thing that you just said, because I think it’s on point,
is that we need to engage the community as leaders. So not just listening to them. JOHN: Yes. KRISTINA: It’s people don’t want
to have things done to them. They want to be a
part of the process. And it makes me uncomfortable,
and perhaps I shouldn’t say this, to be sitting around
the table where we are not representing the dynamics of
Washington and what it looks like, and who is there. And so, already we are group of
people who are making decisions about a school. And I just think it needs to be
at the top of everything we do because it has to
go beyond that. That is how we
lift up communities. And you know that but I just
want to make sure I go on record to say that. JOHN: I agree completely. We tried to do so through our
student learning advocates, through outreached community. We need to make sure that
there’s a broad array of connections with diverse
community groups and again not only from the listening
approach or support approach, but an approach of how can
we have them help us take leadership, how can we help
the leadership around this first voices? KATIE: Andrew then Rhonda. ANDREW: Okay, so, excuse me, I’m
still trying to understand more about what we’re
actually–what’s actually happening here. I don’t doubt the
professional competency. I research pretty thoroughly
before voting for a significant investment like this. But I’m just sitting here
feeling like what I’ve heard so far is a lot of
theory and a reference, yes, a reference to some
manipulatives for math instructions and
positives and negatives. And the leadership styles
assessment that was taken. So, we might’ve got a new–you
might’ve been introduced as you might’ve learned something
about some good manipulatives, which is important. You may have the best leadership
style inventory that would be superior to what others offer,
but I’m sitting here half an hour in kind of not
understanding much else of what actually is happening, like,
what are the things are doing. I’m sure were doing them,
just don’t know what they are. (talking all at once) (laughter) ANDREW: I think, okay. KATIE: And John had
the question so so on… JOHN: As soon as I said do
you have questions I was going to–because part of our
thought was and I will be… KATIE: Somebody has a question. Rhonda has a question. RHONDA: I do, I’ll ask it. Thank you. JOHN: If I can follow up on
Andrew for just a second. Part of our concern was that
we did want to move through the first part relatively quickly
because it is about the context, it is about the theory and the
meat of what we’re doing is in the second half of the report. And we knew if we spent too much
time in context in theory it would feel like an attempted
sales job rather than a report on how we’re doing. And so, that’s
really, you’re correct, Andrew. ANDREW: I’ll put that on hold. Thanks. RHONDA: So, I know
what I’m thinking, but I’m not sure
how to ask this, but I’m just want to try. Such a Kristina’s point about
were all sitting here and it’s a pretty white looking room. We know that’s not reality of
what is happening or what the school looks like. Have you–you mentioned
student learning advocates, have we, and are they
part of this process? Are they part of
this turnaround? I would imagine, I’ve
been in the school, I’ve walked the
hallways with them. And I wondered at times, to me
they know probably more than almost anyone because they’re
receiving students when they’re in their
sometimes a crisis mode, what’s going on in their
minds and maybe the hurdles too, you know, significant
improvement of their own learning, lives, what have you. Are they included
in this turnaround? Are they part of this, the
part of the conversation? I hope the answer is yes. That’s what I’m thinking
about as I’m listening to this. Knowing that what’s at the table
doesn’t really represent what’s in the school, but
we do have people on, I guess, the ground that have
access to the students on a regular basis. And I’m wondering if they
are part of this process. CINDY: So what you’re gonna hear
for the rest of this evening is lot of talk about our
instructional practices, our assessment, and
then our relationships. So yes, they’re involved. However, the work that AIR does
doesn’t necessarily get at every piece of the work that
needs to be done at Washington. So, their focuses on
instructional practice, research-based, that big theory
of how to turn a school around, but there’s other work that
we need to do that doesn’t fit under the AIR umbrella. And we are well aware that there
is definite work that we need to do that doesn’t fit
under the AIR umbrella. RHONDA: So is that no? CINDY: No, that’s not no. Yes, they are involved. In this, they’re not involved in
helping us figure out what our goal is for
literacy or math, however, they are involved in helping us
make sure that we are building solid relationships with
students and really knowing our families and helping us connect
to our families when that gap exists because of the
racial differences that we have. KRISTINA: So you’re
going to explore, you said, that more in
two weeks and come back. CINDY: This is more–like
the work that AIR does is around classroom
instructional practices. The work that the student
learning advocates do and our monitors to are
invaluable in our school, and are invaluable in helping
us make sure that the needs that come into the classroom, but
are different than instructional practices, are
being taken care of. JOHN: When I think of the work
that was done by the student services team that also involves
the student learning advocates and others from Washington,
there is a group that went–it was a black male leadership
group that went to the University of Wisconsin Green
Bay for an all-day summit as well as a female group. VICKI: The district put that on. JOHN: It was put
on by the district. If you can elaborate just a
moment about that if you’d like to. VICKI: Do you have an answer? MICHELLE: If I could add, we
have conversation on Friday about including the student
learning advocates as a critical part of the
administrative conversation. I think it’s very important, I
wholeheartedly agree with what you’re saying is that
every voice matters. We have leaders who
lead in different ways. And so I think it was Jamie
and Cindy and I standing there. I know it was Jamie. Or Judy. I’m sorry. So we have a conversation
actually last Friday because we have that opportunity to
bring in different lenses and obviously those conversations
can be very eye-opening. And it’s, as we start to
increase the number of students or leaders and teachers and
staff who reflect our students, we may not have
everyone in place yet, but again to be able to do bring
that conversation to the table and include our student learning
advocates as part of a portion of an administrative team and
meeting is very essential in my opinion. And I shared that and then we
talked about how that could work and more to come
on that as well. CINDY: One of the
SLA’s was involved in the co-interpretation of the summer. MICHELLE: Yes, that as well. KRISTINA: And I don’t know if I
missed this as well, Michelle. But it would’ve been helpful or
very helpful moving forward to have some sort of a side-by-side
of these are the priorities that AIR is bringing to this project. These are the things
that they are leading on, and as Ms. Olson. CINDY: Cindy. KRISTINA: Okay all right. Those other pieces that
maybe they’re not leading, but her supportive order are
sort of like another tier of the work. Because I didn’t understand
or I’m not understanding. MICHELLE: We’re working progress
as well as we continuous learning. CINDY: That would
be really helpful. JOHN: I think as well when
we get onto our next slide, our metrics for success and
when we’re asking for input, that will also help articulate
what are the areas under which are focused under the AIR sphere
of influence and put of their additional work that
we’re doing at Washington. KATIE: And the Judy
that Michelle–Judy Wall, our system
principal at Washington. MICHELLE: And I apologize. CATHERINE: The key
component of the work, and if you remember that
implementation pathway is the part that was in the middle, the
continuous improvement piece in all of our work is
the harvest monitoring. Again, collecting the data,
making sure that we’re making progress on the goals that have
been established both for the school and for the AIR team. So we have monthly
meetings with the district team, we have several instruments
that we used to collect data throughout the year. We’ll do another reality check
in January where we’ll do a deep dive into the implementation
initiatives that the school, look at all the
data that we have, look at where
we’re making progress, look at where we may not have
made as much progress as we have intended, and then develop a
course correction action plan that takes us to the
end of the school year. Providing the monthly monitoring
reports that Cindy will talk about here in just a minute,
and then at the end of the year we’ll do another review and
planning meeting that cues up the summer and going
into another school year. JOHN: So now are about to move
into the September report and the highlights of what
we’ve done related to those highlights. And I want to share
the report with you. Again, because this is the first
report we wanted to do with in context. But we also have to remember
that it takes a week or so after the month closes for
AIR to complete a report, share with us, for
us to fine-tune it. There is little bit of a
delay in having it here now. But that was partly because we
wanted to make sure that the structure of the report was
based on what we had gathered from the board and others that
would be something that would be beneficial. So we want to share this with
you and also know that we would have our October report in the
upcoming November 19 session. So, Cindy, if you would mind
sharing some of the highlights. CINDY: Sure. So through our coaching
conversations it was determined that we needed to focus on
defining our measures of success a little bit more specifically. Our measures needed to be a
woven into school success plan. So is it met with Green Bay
Public Area School District office folks to determine where
is going to be the best way to find a data that we needed and
then what would that data look like that we would be gathering
to help us more move on the goals that we had? (laughter) CINDY: Ooh, that’s okay. He’ll come back. JOHN: So we listened to what the
board said about and recommended in September. And then we acted upon those
recommendations in October. So, as I bring this back up. So, our September
recommendations become our October actions. CINDY: So last month we work
to solidify our measures of success. We’ve establish these targets
which we are going to talk about in the future slides. And our goals focus in those
three areas of instruction, assessment, and relationships. Our first measure of success is
that by the end of this school year 42% of our Washington
Middle School students will score basic or above on the
Math Wisconsin Forward Exam. Again that’s a legging indicator
in its increase of 12%. So it’s a one year goal. This is not what we aspire to. We’re currently 30% of our
students are at basic or above. And that is on the assessment. So I think an important
piece of when we prepare for the Wisconsin Forward is
helping those with students will understand the why. Why are you taking
this assessment? Why do we need you to do
well in this assessment? Why is this
information important to us? All of those are important
pieces of making sure that is communicated with students. So through focus, our
focus building wide work on instructional
practice, interventions, and completed in math and then
the use of common assessments will be used able to focus our
instructional strategies and practices that help to
improve our student learning. JOHN: So I think it’s important
to recognize as well that this represents the
trajectory change, although there is positive
growth that is expected in the first year. But we have to remember, too,
that when the scores were in decline, it’s–there’s work
involved in turning that process so that is becoming a positive
and the positives we’re seeing, we will see growth this year. There will be significantly
accelerated growth in the second year as well. We will be seeing progress,
we will be seeing significant growth. The structures that are needed
to be developed and put into place throughout the year as
well as the input that we’re getting from our leadership
and instructional coaches, that will change the way we work
with students and with the way we work with teachers. And we will have results. We will have payoff and
that growth will accelerate significantly further in
the second year as well. CINDY: So the next–go ahead. KATIE: Ed? ED: I’m jumping way
ahead here and I realize, John, the one of the things as
far as next steps is to do talk about how are going to
share this publicly. The suggestion I have
regarding measures success here. When we talk
about basic or above, perhaps some
definitions in there. When were talking
about four levels. JOHN: Sure. KATIE: Excellent. ED: Maybe just some explanation
about so that clarity around just what those levels are. JOHN: I appreciate that. ED: What that means. CINDY: So, on the
English language arts portion, that’s a good tongue
twister right there, of the Wisconsin Forward, is it
important to understand this is not only the work of our
English-language arts teachers. Literacy happens in all
content areas including math. And it really is all of our
content areas that need to participate in helping students
become literate in their content area. So, when we had our professional
learning in October, all non-math teachers
participated in professional development under the
umbrella of literacy. And it’s really about creating
content literate students. So you can be literate in band,
you can be literate and art, you can be literate in literacy. So helping students and helping
teachers understand solid research-based teaching
strategies to help students become literate in
their content area. So in order for us to make
this progress on the school, the focus needs to be on all
teachers working to improve their strategies in the
classroom to help move that literacy goal. It can’t fall on the shoulders
of just those content area teachers. JOHN: Also, the examined
instructional strategy changes will not just be
related to literacy and math. We’re looking at things like
how do you close a lesson, how clear is your objective,
what type of gradual release are you using because we want
to make sure that it’s, as Cindy said,
very inclusive goal, focused on math and literacy,
but then also focusing on what are the key core instructional
changes that we can have an all teachers to be as
engaging as possible? KATIE: Rhonda? RHONDA: When this is happening
when we talk about teachers having all of this
information and coaching? What is this? Throughout the school day? What is this happening? CINDY: Is a couple
of different times. So on early release days, that
afternoon is spent doing the professional learning. And we are fortunate to have
Tag and Doug on site for our September 19
professional development day. So, they led the professional
learning for our math teachers and then are non-math teachers. And then, each
department, or grade level, has a CLT,
collaborative learning team. So, they meet at
minimum on a weekly basis. But I know they meet every day. And we’re working on focusing
and really on what the conversation is around during
those CLT times that were focusing in on data
and instruction data, using data to make
decisions on what you’re doing in the classroom, and the
strong instructional practices. Each department has a department
chair that participates as a member of our
building leadership team. So then we work and talk
about those high leverage instructional strategies and
they actually help define what those look fors are
in the classroom. So, when we talk about
closure, gradual release of responsibility, or
independent practice, our building leadership team
help define what those look fors are for us this week
coming to do the walk-throughs. RHONDA: Does this going
into their prep time at all? CINDY: No, as part of their
professional responsibility. It’s one of your–and someone
can be able to speak of this better than I can. But CLT time is an expectation. So then we go into our climate
and culture perception survey. And that’s the survey
that families take, staff takes, and students take
at the end of the school year. Actually twice in the year. I think they take it in the
fall and then in the spring. And these focus area are
determined based on our scores. So, one of the questions is the
school’s academic expectations are too high, just
right, or too low. And when you look at
Washington’s data, this is the staff survey, 33
our of 55 said it was too low. So, our goal is
to increase that. That we’re going to increase our
expectations for students and increase the number of teachers
that are saying that our expectations are just right for
students versus that we’re not setting the bar high enough. Another area is that discipline
is being handled on a consistent manner. Our goal is to decrease the 84%
of disagree or strongly disagree to 15%. Disagree or strongly disagree
with 85% agreeing that we are handling discipline on
a consistent manner. I think part of that is
defining what consistent is. For different people it
means different things. So I think we need to
define a consistent means. And that our last growth area
for our perceptual survey is that the school or
department operates as a team. We are just a little bit below
half that disagree or strongly disagree. We are going to work on
increasing that so that 85% of our staff really believe that
the work that they’re doing is because they operate as
department or a team. RHONDA: I have a
question about that. I’ve had parents reach out to
me about there’s no homework, apparently, given at the school. They have questions about that. And their concern is that
obviously they go on high school where there’s homework. The practice of no
homework, what is that? CINDY: I don’t know
if it’s a school, I would have to look
into little bit more. If every teacher
doesn’t have homework, I don’t know that that’s true. There’s not a lot of research
about homework having any helpful gains to for students,
especially students that struggle because what we’re
doing is we’re sending students home with work to do who you
struggle to themselves sometimes at home, or if my daughters are
coming home with their math when they’re in second grade, look
at them and tell them my way of solving the problem, but it’s
not the way that the teacher wants them to solve the problem. So if we’re going to send
students home with homework, we have to educate families on
what we want that completion of homework to look like. So there’s not a lot of research
that says homework does anything to improve student learning. RHONDA: Okay, buy my daughter
goes to school where she has homework three times a week. So is that a district thing? JOHN: Well, start we pointed out
with our work with AIR we have to look at some, which are
different strategies that we can use particularly to Washington? There a lot of times that the
work done at Washington may need to deviate from what our
standard of practice might be for another school
within the district, but I do think there’s a lot
to be said for what Cindy is pointing out around the
independent practice that students participate in
needs to be structured, particularly for students who
are far behind and are at risk. And if we simply send students
home with a pile of homework that they don’t have the
competency to do on their own, and we don’t give them the
guidance and then we base a lot of what their grades are on and
their sense of purpose or sense of passing or not passing is
based on with a complete that independent practice, it can be
a struggle for those students. So we have to find ways of
making sure that the students do have independent practice. Independent practice is the
critical part of homework, but how can we make sure
it’s happening in a meaningful, supported scaffolded
way within the classroom. RHONDA: And I hear that, but I’m
just concerned about obviously they going to another
school where there’s significant homework. How that transition works. I think that could be a
liability for some kids. CINDY: Yeah. I’ll find out. JOHN: It is something that
working on it is something as well that we look at between
elementary and high school, that it needs to
be a transition. So were gradually gearing the
students up so that the ready for that homework, that there
may be less homework at sixth grade in seventh grade as they
build and then as they proceed in the high school and
proceeded to the higher grades, there’s more homework. But I do think that piece
around academic expectations is critical. We can’t, I think sometimes
as people who want to help students, we sometimes in-depth
lowering the bar just a little bit because we want
kids to be successful, we want you to give that chance
and have the zone of proximal development. But if we continue to lower with
at the bar again and again over time with maybe a
good intention, will end up with what we saw
that the co-interpretation and we have very positive
teachers at Washington, but we saw that the students
were sometimes engaged in activity, but the activity in
which they were engaged was really quite low
from an instructional, intellectual load. So they might’ve been doing an
activity that they were working on something, but the payoff
as far as what the instruction, the instructional payoff
related to that work, it wasn’t as clear in some of
the observations that we found. And again, that’s not to say
that it wasn’t done with good intention and there aren’t
hard, hard-working teachers at Washington, but we have to
figure out ways to making the work challenging, yet
accessible for the students. TAG: And I think that’s for
the instructional coach comes in because you do
have, at that school, caring teachers who
are working hard. And, but their
experience in school is very different from their
experiences teachers in the school. And so, that’s where instead,
you say all kids can learn, but all kids don’t
learn the same way. And that’s why having
someone come in and saying, try this method,
that sort of thing. The goal is not to change
what teachers are doing if it’s working, the goal is to support
change in research-based ways that happened was success in
other places for them to try there, to try to raise the bar
without saying were just going to raise it. If you’re going to
have higher expectations, there needs to be
higher supports. And that’s with the
education–that’s what the instructional coaching is about. KATIE: Ed? ED: Go ahead. KRISTINA: I just have a
professional question, Michelle. This is for you. The climate and culture
perception survey that was the link on here, was that
parents and teachers? MICHELLE: To me,
can you clarify? It looked like the
school perception survey. CINDY: The data was
from the staff side of it. KRISTINA: Okay, but who else? There was other data, right? CINDY: Yes, but
not used in this. MICHELLE: This looks like school
perception questions from school perception survey that we’ve
given for several years now. Based on what I was reading in
the questions in terms of asking educators if they, where
they find the level of rigor. And student learning. KRISTINA: So the staff data
was pulled in for your action planning. Was the parent piece pulled in? Was that data used
in any sort of… CINDY: And was too small? KRISTINA: Was I gonna
be a next question? CINDY: Yeah, it was too small so
we have to do better job getting parents to provide input on
what we can do to improve. KRISTINA: Okay, and have
one follow-up question, sorry. Do you–what is
the students pool, are you survaying them, how is
their voice being pulled into this as well? CINDY: Yes, so we looked at
some of their perception data, which we’ll get to
in a little bit. And then we’re doing a couple
of different surveys that we’ll talk about in a
couple more slides. KRISTINA: Okay, just wanted to
make sure when I was looking at this that I knew what
you’re talking about. CINDY: Yeah,
thank you very much. KATIE: Ed? ED: Full disclosure, my biases
strongly around humanistic theory, Maslow’s Hierarchy. And I think culture
trumps everything. So lay that out there. So what do you see the
implications being of the culture issues that are
documented in this survey and the likelihood of success for
the building capacity of the higher order concepts that
you’re trying to achieve through coaching? TAG: One of the expressions I
really like in mathematics is an existence proof. In the idea of an existence
proof is you’re showing that something is possible. And when teachers see
that something is possible, then they’ll work
to replicate it. Because that’s what
they’re all about, they’re there to make,
help kids get successful. And that’s what
they’re looking for. So, the idea is that
if we have you know, when we have good activities and
good things happening and kids start saying, I see this, as
they get a chance to do this, then it changes the
culture in the room. And this doesn’t
happen overnight, it happens kid by kid as student
start to realize they have agency and they see that
engagement will increase their learning and they start to think
about themselves as learners. ED: And I realize
that, you know, there’s AIR and there’s
the Green Bay schools. But I share Kristina’s
concern of what she was speaking of earlier. Some of the unmet needs that
the kids have that are being, well, the behaviors, you know,
the disengagement that are, really don’t have a lot to
do with the lessons going on, but these are things that have
to be addressed before the kids are going to be
engaged by the lessons. So, and I just
put that out there, you know, the data, 84%
disagreeing about discipline being handled
inconsistent manner. Just under one half
not operating as a team, academic
expectations being too low, at least in my mind, those
things have to be addressed first before you can get at how
are going to change our lessons to engage kids? So I mean you disagree? JOHN: Agree. I do agree, think if you
look at the scores there, it talks about the amount
of work that is needed, talks about the lift that will
have to take place in that there won’t be an
immediate turnaround. I wouldn’t expect that in
November or December we will see everything is completely changed
at Washington because if half the people at the end of the
year felt like they weren’t a team, that’s going to require
significantly different work. And I think that we talked a
little bit about last week, we have to make sure that the
chaos that sometimes happens when there is an overabundance
of discipline issues and when there aren’t the
structures in place, those elements are foundational
to making sure that our administration has time
to get in the classroom, and that the instructors, when
the teachers on the teaching have an opportunity
to teach good lessons. So, the work we’re doing, it’s
not just about the instructional changes that need to take
place, there are also aspects of support that Judy and Cindy are
working on related to supports from the state RTI Center
and work around our positive behavior and interventions the
supports with the behavioral team. If we don’t
address those pieces, then you know if Cindy can’t get
into a classroom because she has 10 kids waiting in the office,
there isn’t going to be that ability to have that feedback. So the important to have that
both and it’s important have metrics around both. And I think you’ll see some
positives as far as some of the data were seeing as well
as some of the next steps. Judy? JUDY: I’ll also add that even
though tonight were listening to the AIR report and there’s a lot
of them instructional coaching and leadership coaching, the
comment earlier about coming back in two weeks and really
showing what AIR focus as well that is Washington Middle School
and the other initiatives, because I know in my work
with Cindy there’s a lot of work going on regarding climate
culture as well as how are we really, authentically engaging
different members of our community? Whether it’s the
African community, the Latino community,
our Somalian parents, and I know Cindy has a number of
good things that she’s putting in place. So it will be a great
opportunity for us to come back in two weeks and really
highlight those sections as well. ED: Thank you. I think that’s
critically important. And I think most–I
shouldn’t say most, but a lot of the who folks to–I
talked to about this continued issue are more concerned
today with the climate culture aspects, not that they
don’t care about this, the academics and you kmow, I
certainly do understand what we’re at here. But those are the things that
seem to be most on people’s minds, at least the
folks I’ve been talking to. KATIE: Kristina. KRISTINA: I just wanted to
add one other thing as well. Cindy, when you come back I
would love–can you go back to the discipline–the last. I know I was the
chart that you had. JOHN: Sure. KRISTINA: That’s, okay, things
like when you say their student discipline will be
handled consistently. Just when you come back I would
love to be able to have some language, some shared language
around with those types of things mean to you because
discipline can be handled consistently and
it can be terrible. JOHN: Right. We suspend every day. KRISTINA: But I do. I think these are things in our
community needs to understand that we are using a
consistent message, we have a shared vision, we are
committed to a positive climate and what that looks like. And so, it’s just a suggestion. Thank you. KATIE: Andrew? ANDREW: I guess, I have to agree
with what Ed is saying here. If we didn’t have the level of
student behavior concerns and disengagement that we have, I
think we have–I don’t know that we would have needed
to look for an extra, invest in an extra hand on this
because we have academic experts in our organization. What’s new, I think, is the
culture and climate piece. And I would think having studied
the school perception survey, I don’t know that there really
is a place to say on that survey that student discipline
isn’t good here except in that question, which is
consistent manner. There isn’t a question on there
on student expectations are, you know, too
strict, too soft. That’s really the only place
that you can say you have a problem with student behavior. And 84.4% are still saying that. So that, I think,
that’s what I would say, too. CINDY: This last year’s data. KATIE: The last year. CINDY: That’s from the spring. ANDREW: All right. CINDY: Of last year. ANDREW: Okay. CINDY: That’s our base, this
raising the baseline before I, so that’s, what are
you taking to May? MICHELLE: April. CINDY: April 2018. ANDREW: But when we–yeah,
but when we give it again. CINDY: Oh, yes. ANDREW: We’re still only
gonna have one place outside of comments because that survey–my
point is that survey has really one question for you to weigh
in on the student discipline and it’s that question. So when–it’s not like there’s a
separate one for inconsistency. I think when you rate low there,
that’s where you’re signaling in that survey that you’re
concerned about student behavior. And, yeah again, I guess my
point being similar to what Ed was saying. I think that my vote to bring
the extra hand in here was for the turnaround on what’s going
wrong with student behavior and culture issues more so than
academics that will certainly take input about
academic practices as well. JOHN: If I can put out an idea
that is probably not the most popular. We did have another group work
with us several years ago would West had come in and look at
what they did an analysis to look at what was the problem. And we did have a school success
team that we put together to go in and look at
what was the problem. And now we’ve had AIR come in
and go deep and look at what is the problem. In all three times we had
a really similar answer. And it’s a harder answer, it’s a
harder definition of what that barrier is across the road
that we would like to see. The easier answer would be we
need a tougher sheriff in a principal, are we needed to
kinder sheriff in a principal. Or we need a more consistent
sheriff and possy with the principal. Those are important,
those are critical. But what we found with the
West-Ed piece and what we found there are school success team
and what we’re finding through the AIR work is that a lot
of the behavioral issues, and again this is not popular,
relate to the educators being as engaging as we need it to be. And so that workaround change
in the instructional practice, it is the upstream work. The downstream work of making
sure that the behavioral once a kid is in the
office, in the hallway, that is important, too. We can’t have that
done in a shoddy manner, in a manner that
is overly punitive, or in a manner that isn’t
going to change behavior. Those structures
need to be in place. You have to, like,
tamed the wild West, I was saying, before you can get
to that higher level work to an extent. But if we never get
to that upstream work, if we never get to changing
the engagement level of our students, we will
continue to have the symptom, which is the behavior. KATIE: Michelle. MICHELLE: As we
reviewed some of the data, and this was just as of late, we
have students who do extremely well in some classrooms during
school day and not so swell in behavior in others. And so, it’s really trying to
find out what that bar–that roadblock is to
that child’s learning. Sometimes it may be a situation
where the child knows that they don’t have what’s going on in
the classroom and it is not relatable because they don’t
have the skills because maybe they’ve behind them is
overwhelming and they just figure I can’t do this. So I’m just getting out of here. And their behavior
made accelerate. Sometimes it’s feeling not
welcome in the classroom. So it’s really looking
at–because if you have a child, and that’s why these
teams are so important, collaborative teams,
because you share the data. You look at the data together. Well, how come Michelle is
doing really well in your class? Well, Michelle loves your class. Why is that? You know, because we
have children who are very inconsistent in where they
perform and there’s reasons for that. So, that’s part of that
culture shift as well is that, you know, if having been a
teacher and kids know when you don’t believe. You know, if you believe in
every child who works to your door and you greet them by name
and you stand at your doorway, they feel like
they’re part of the team. And they’ll go to
the wall for you. They will. And that’s what I have seen. And sometimes that’s part of
that social emotional piece, too, because you start to
then really understand what that child’s needs are and be able
to address what Mr. Dorff is talking about. But at the same time helping
that child get what they need so that they can find the success. And so, it’s that fine balance
and it’s heavy lifting and it’s really sometimes just a growth
mindset about believing what children can do and also it goes
back to what you were talking about, that sense of efficacy. If I know and I can
see that I can do this, then I–so it’s balancing those
pieces is what my experience has been. And it’s not for lack of desire,
it’s trying to figure all this pieces out. Because sometimes a child can’t
articulate what’s going on and how they feel, if
that makes sense. CINDY: I had a
conversation with Donna about, you know, we have all this work
to do with climate and culture and all this work to do
with instructional practice. How do we do it all? And they would say,
correct me if I’m wrong, you do both at the same time. ED: Yes. CINDY: And you can’t
pick one over the other. You have to do both
at the same time. So we have a lot of work to do. CATHERINE: In every situation
where I was a turnaround principal and every situation
where we have coached principals for going through an intensive
school improvement process, we always come to this place. And student discipline is
probably the number one indicator of a school that has
been chronically low performing. The discipline and the culture
is usually indicative of the academic low expectations. And so, even though you may
not say to me that you have low academic expectations to me, the
way that we teach our students, the way the
lessons are designed, the thought that’s
put into those lessons, the practices that are
used in those lessons, send a message to the student
that had have low expectations of you and therefore, this is
what you get back in return is students–is a
self-fulfilling belief. And when we raise the bar on
teachers providing professional development, providing coaching,
building their efficacy, breaking the cycle of failure
in their mind that the students can’t learn, or these students
are only capable of learning so much, when that
starts to change and tip, then the students start to
believe in their own selves. And then you start to see
things really start to quickly accelerate. You’ll see student
achievement will accelerate, you’ll see a decrease in
discipline referrals because students are
engaged in classroom. They feel like the teacher
really understands them and is able to meet their
individual learning needs. And then, you’re going to see
that sense of teamness is really important, too, in the
culture and climate piece. When teachers are
working together, students feel that those
teachers are working together and they in turn really
feel that investment in their learning. We’ve experience this everywhere
we’ve been that discipline piece, the instructional piece. And as Cindy said, they
both have to rise together. These students need to learn. That’s why they go to school. It’s our responsibility to
provide that quality education to them. And when we focus on the
instructional side of it, then we’re also able to get
with the discipline side. But to focus on the discipline
side and not address their academic needs is, I think,
an injustice and unfairness to them. And so, really working with the
teachers to design lessons that keep kids engaged, that meet
their needs where they are is really been a
proven best practice. And at the same time
implementing the strategies that you have going on
in your PBIS, the RTI, those other piece is
the wrap around and support that instructional programming. They need time to practice,
they need time to learn, they need time to really
hone these strategies to where they’re all working together so
that then you see it from the outside, you can
see what’s happening. So I think one of the other
things that happens in these school improvement processes is
that we get impatient to want to see happen really quickly. The school didn’t
get here overnight, and it’s therefore going to
take time for the adults in the building to learn how to do
things in a different way, and then in turn for the
students to learn how to do things in a
different way, too, as well. I would like to wake up
tomorrow weighing 125 pounds. It’s not going to
happen overnight. It’s going to take time and
effort on my part to work at a program that’s going to
get me where I want to go. And that’s what Cindy’s trying
to do right now with the team of folks at her school both the
support from her district and the support from AIR right now. It’s going to take all of us
working together to support these teachers and the
students at that school. Give them time and space
to practice and to learn. And then, we go in and you
can see we’re very focused on monitoring and collecting data. We ask ourselves this
question every single day, are we going aimed, lined up
to the targets that we set? Are we making progress? How do we know? If we are making progress, what
do we need to adjust for today? Cindy is very data focused. She’s getting her
hands on the data. And she’s very results oriented. So I have a lot of faith in her. And she is a good support team
all the way around her, too. They need time to
implement the strategies. CINDY: Thank you. Can you click? RHONDA: I’m curious what you
think since you been to 40+ districts across the country. What do you think about
the school building itself? Like, the classrooms? KRISTINA: Physical environment? RHONDA: The physical
environment of the school. TAG: Well, I’ve been in, for one
thing it seems the buildings in pretty good shape. I mean, you know, there are
people keeping the building clean during the day,
not just before and after. I’ve been in the
lots worse buildings. RHONDA: But would you say that,
and I’m not even thinking about the cleanliness of the building. I think about the feeling of
the building in the classrooms, just in general. You know, human beings, we are
affected by our space which is why people spend a
lot of money decorating in redesigning their homes. We’re asking kids to be in
building for certain amount of time during the week. I’m just
wondering what you think, and if you believe that a
physical structure actually affects students in
their learning capacity. TAG: Outside of my area of
expertise I will–all I can say is that when I going into
the classrooms they feel like pleasant places and I don’t
notice any deficits in what’s happening. I mean, it you know, give got
the technology support for kids in place with the document
cams and the projectors and that access to technology that
teachers are using and were working on using, you know,
slightly different ways to make it more effective. So, those things are there. I haven’t been in a room
yet that was particularly uncomfortable. I understand that Green
Bay gets a little colder later in the year. But as far as, you
know, a dismal place, does not feel like a
dismal place as I come in. And there’s light
and their space. RHONDA: But you’re
there once a month. TAG: I’m just saying
you asked for my opinion. That’s what I’m noticing. RHONDA: Are you aware that
there are nine questions without Windows? TAG: Have I–I don’t know
that I–let’s see I have, I’ve been one of the classrooms
without windows that I know of. And they got nice glass door. And I did not feel–actually
have been in two of them. And in both cases
there are bright places. And so I did not. Now that you mention it, yeah,
they didn’t have the windows, but they are bright places
and they didn’t seem dark or unwelcoming it all. RHONDA: I’m just thinking
because this conversation that the student does well in one
class and goes to another class and then doesn’t
maybe do as well. I also have a question
about school starts at 7:30? CINDY: 7:35. RHONDA: Okay,
what time is lunch? CINDY: Funny you should ask. Our first lunch is at 10:28. Our second lunch is at 11:24,
and our third lunch is that 12:20. If I wouldn’t have this with me
I would be able to answer the question. RHONDA: Okay, is there any,
has there been any discussion or thought about the kids that
maybe have lunch at did you say 10:20? And then do they have an
opportunity to eat again until the end of the day? CINDY: They don’t have a
school provided snack to them. But teachers let them eat. RHONDA: But they if they didn’t
bring something themselves they don’t necessarily
have something. CINDY: No. RHONDA: And I asked that
question because at my daughter’s school
lunches at 10:20, 10:30. And I’ve never really quite
understood how that’s–by the time you hit 1:00 you and I
would not be able to do our work effectively after not
eating for so many hours. I just wonder
about, and you know, they seem like little things,
but to me the really big things. CINDY: So we have granola bars. KRISTINA: So you
meeting the basic needs. CINDY: We have granola bar
stationed in a couple different places in the building. And so, when you kids, if
they don’t have their own snack, they know to come to get them. And then some teachers do sell
school approved snacks and their classrooms. For a quarter. And I know that if a kid
doesn’t have a quarter, they’re gonna give them a snack. KRISTINA: I think in your
presentation those are, like, really good. I always–my background
is in health and wellness. And so, so are the think
things like are the kids being physically active
during the day, do they have ability in their
instructional practice to be moving around the classroom? CINDY: Absolutely. KRISTINA: Are they connecting
can kinesthetic learning to what they’re doing? Are they having healthy snacks? We have a fabulous food
service department here. CINDY: Absolutely. KRISTINA: How are
they supporting them? What do you need from them? Those would be those pieces that
would go back that I think to what Ed was saying about
Maslow’s Hierarchy of needs. I called the whole child. It’s the same thing, right? I mean, hungry. RHONDA: And I worry about, you
know we’re still where students need to identify I’m
hungry, I need something. They still
sometimes have to do that. They obviously have
to do that themselves. If you’re having lunch at 10:20
and you’re not able to come to that conclusion that you
need something to eat, and it’s 1:30–quarter til 2,
because for whatever reason you can’t make that. I guess, I feel like
it’s such a basic thing, but I’ve asked my daughter, the
worst class that she experiences with the behavior is it 2:00. KRISTINA: You’re hungry. RHONDA: That’s not an accident. KRISTINA: It would be
interesting to talk to food service to see if, I
mean, to explore that. JOHN: I think what we
consider next steps, I think thinking about the whole
child is a critical piece when talk like an
kinesthetic learning. If engagement is
one of our issues, having more
kinesthetic learning, making sure that
you’re well fed, those are factors into
wellness and always factor into engagement specifically. KRISTINA: Get some wisdom. JOHN: Thinking about a measures
of success and what we have also thinking about attendance
is one of our next measures. And I know we have a question. KATIE: We do have a question. JOHN: But the thinking about
health and food and wellness can affect attendance, too. KATIE: John, I’m
calling on Jamie. Jamie, go ahead. JAMIE: With the topic of food. I know at the high school level
we have a meal provided to us at 3:00 at the end of the day. Does that translate to
middle and elementary as well? KRISTINA: Do you guys
have the dinner program? CINDY: That’s very interesting,
I know nothing about the dinner program. KRISTINA: So that is
something–I believe you guys are CEP at
Washington Middle School, free-for-all? CINDY: Yes. KRISTINA: So, that will
be a good step program. You guys have a fabulous
dinner program over there. JAMIE: Yes, we do. KRISTINA: Especially with
after school programs and such. Great idea, Jamie. CINDY: Jamie, what time
does your school day end? JAMIE: 3:00. CINDY: Well, thank you. CATHERINE: Now on page
19 of your presentation. KATIE: And I know you gonna come
back in a couple weeks– CINDY: Yes. KATIE: –but I feel obligated
to allow you to finish your– CINDY: How kind
of you, thank you. So the next area is getting
at some of those measures that don’t necessarily fall
under the AIR umbrella. This will be us looking
at improving attendance. So we took a cohort of our
current seventh and eighth grade students. So our baseline is seventh grade
students and we took their data from when they were six graders,
and we took our eighth grade students and take that data of
when they were seventh graders. So, we want to
improve their attendance. And then if you look at a
baseline is that 25.7% of our seventh graders and 32.9% of our
eighth graders have more than 15 days of absence. So really targeting and focusing
in on those students that are just short of that and seeing
what we can do to help them avoid getting to that. The next area is to
reduce disciplinary incidents. And so, since the
start of the school year, that’s this year’s dada, 92.35%
of our students have zero or one admin managed referral. And last year at the same
time that percentage was 85.23. So it increased that
percentage by 7% in two months. And then last year at this
time there were 159 incidents of suspension. And in the first two
months this year there was 66. Some of the things that were
going to build those measures of success are working on having
students identify positive relations, positive
relationships at Washington Middle School. So at the end
of–I’m on slide 21. By the end of this school
year our students are going to participate in a
reverse to dots program, reverse dots survey. The goal would be that they
identify at least one adult at the school, that they
have a relationship with. On our fall school climate
survey 50 to 60% of the students last year reported that
they felt respected by adults. So part of our
school success plan goal, one of the goals is to look
at the concept of respect, talking about it both in what
does it look like to students and what does it
look like two adults. I’ve done this conversation
before with students and adults and I really quite honestly
the answer is the same for both. It looks like sounds like and
feels like the same for adults and students but having that
conversation really helps lay the foundation so that we’re
speaking the same language with our students. So, current action steps
toward improving our instruction practices. Our CLT conversations are
connected to data and common assessments. Raising star assessment to
inform decisions about next steps in instruction. And then with our
classroom walk-throughs, so we are definitely in
classrooms more at Washington than I would say other schools
in Green Bay and maybe in most places. So this is, this is our
two-week cycle that were doing. So the first two weeks focus was
and learning targets enclosure. And we did 21 classroom
walk-throughs with our admin team. That increased to 24 for
the next two-week cycle, gradual release of
responsibility was our focus. In this last two weeks we
focused on checking for understanding. And the Washington admin
team did 53 walk-throughs. RHONDA: That is impressive. CINDY: That is huge. RHONDA: Very impressive. CINDY: Our next focus for the
next two weeks is independent practice. So we then go back and share
with staff what we were looking for, what we saw. And then we’ll do that with the
last two weeks when we focus on independent practice as well. ED: Cindy, do you come in
with a specific rubric on these walk-throughs? CINDY: We’re not using a rubric
right now for the baseline data collection. We are–were
using the same tool, and I can absolutely share that
with you and bring that next time. KATIE: That would be great. CINDY: So, it started with our
focus on closure activities. So we start by looking at what
the learning target is and if there’s an exit slip or some
kind of closure activity that the teacher is doing, building
on that we had a gradual release of responsibility. So there’s really a
place to document that I do, we do, you do concept of the
lesson this built around gradual release of responsibility. Then this last two weeks we
went and we were focusing on understanding. So what kinds of questions were
the teachers using when they were looking at the
instruction that they did? What were they asking students
to do in the classroom to make sure they understood not only
what they were supposed to be doing, but the concept of the
material that was presented. And then this next week will be
looking at independent practice. And our BLT actually
determine the work fors, our building leadership team,
determine the look fors for independent practice and
checking for understanding. But yes,
absolutely, I’ll bring it. It’s connected to
Danielson as well. So we took the different areas
and connected them back to the Danielson domains
and components, which is the tool that we
use to evaluate teachers. The next area focuses on
our behavioral progress, so we have seen a reduction in
suspension so far this year, when you look at last year, by
September and October there were 712 major referrals, 712. That’s a huge number. A major referral is,
yes, a major referral, thank you. It’s defined as administrative. It’s dealt with by
an administrator. And then this year we’re at
252 during the same time period. KATIE: Yes, Andrew. ANDREW: So, there’s two ways we
can have dramatic drop in those referrals. So, I guess maybe
there’s actually three, you could quit–I mean,
you could the behaviors, the negative behaviors
could reduce greatly, meaning less referrals. Or, teachers could refer fewer
things to the office for the same–teacher manage
incidents that could be office managed, which
often is a good thing, but sometimes people take one
for the team too much, right. Or they’re just
hopefully not this one, but maybe not writing referrals
because they tried that last year and it didn’t work. So I would assume if we’re
talking about a 70% drop between September/October last year’s
in September/October this year. I’m hoping that people in
the building would say, who been there both years,
with have seen there been a big noticeable change. Or are we just
processing it differently? CINDY: We haven’t
change process. One thing that is different work
that was done last year towards the middle of the school year,
the heat pride process was in implemented at Washington Middle
School where teachers establish corrective
classroom action steps. So each teacher has four steps
within their classroom that they implement. Steps one and two are handled
in the classroom and steps three and four handled
outside the classroom. Step three is handled in the
student is returned to class. Step four is
administrative managed. So, what were seeing is the
capacity of teachers was built around handling lower-level
behaviors so that they could be dealt with in the classroom
rather than the student being sent out so they lose
that instructional time. ED: So there is a difference
between how they were handled September/October last
year and how they’re handled September/October this year? CINDY: Correct. ED: So that does skew
the data some then. CINDY: However, I think the
thing that it you see here, and it’s in the
summary up above. So it’s increase positive
interactions between staff and students and increase teacher
capacity is the change for the numbers I think. Our students are the same, we
didn’t get new students and we are not, not entering
information into the computer. We’re handling the
behavior that happens. I do believe the
capacity for the teachers, the capacity with the teachers
to handle those behaviors is what led to the change. ED: Can ask what your
protocol is for suspension? Do you as principal have to
approve all suspensions or do the APs have authority to
suspend without running it by you? CINDY: They don’t
have to run it by me. We do have an agreement that
we always bounce the idea off another admin. So our team doesn’t make
those decisions in silos, we make those in collaboration. ED: John, is that the same
as it was last year or is it different? JOHN: I think that there is a
heightened sense of making sure that you have a
thinking partner, even many years as an
administrator I would sometimes bounce an idea off my
assistant principal, even when I was principal or
another principal just to say that, you know, this
is what I’m thinking. How would you have handled it? Make sure that you’re aligned. I think that there is
no fault in doing that. I think we’ve seen other
instances when that’s not done, and sometimes there’s
poor decision-making. So I think that it is
something critical. Another kind of side note of
something we’ve seen as far as a measure of this. When I would go into Washington
last year and meet with Molly O’Neill for instance, one
of the assistant principals, I would usually
get there, you know, if it was an afternoon
meeting a little after three, she just be sitting down to
trying to grab a bite of a sandwich that she
meant to eat at noon. And being able to be at
Washington and occasionally meet with administration and have
a moment of uninterrupted time where you can–and I’m not
saying that they’re not working, but uninterrupted time where you
can focus on something rather than triaging
discipline all the time. And I realize it’s a
qualitative piece. There’s more time that is
been able to be focused on those instructional walks,
things of that nature. It is a shift. Is it completely better? By no means. There’s still a lot
of work to be done. But I think that shift we did
run mid-year last year when we looked at how does the state
define what is administrator dealt with versus
teacher dealt with? How does the nation define that? And then we started our work
around how can we draw that line back closer to where it
should be and how can we support teachers and giving them skills? There’s been a lot of work done
by your administration and your administrative team as well
as people prior to you coming related to increasing teacher
capacity to deal with those misbehaviors. KATIE: Are programmers aware
that the administrators at Washington are on rolling desks? They have rolling workstations
and they’re out in the hallways. KRISTINA: Can we get a
rolling desk in here for us? KATIE: You can. JOHN: Great kinesthetics
for administration people? KATIE: They’re available
and they’re out there. KRISTINA: That’s really cool. JOHN: So, those are
our measures of success. We’ve had a degree of input
and we can take that into our consideration before we
come back on the 19th, but is there are other
suggestions for measures of success, we’d like to have
those shared through the board. Also, we want to make sure that
all the documents that we shared tonight will be publicly shared. That’s important. Again, it wasn’t meant to not be
transparent or anything of that nature, it was meant to make
sure that we were able to tell the story with in
context tonight. And, as a work session
since this is the first time reporting, we wanted to make
sure the way we report and the measures that we are using
match the needs of the board. So, we will be incorporating
board input on those measures of success to bring
back on the 19th. And then we’ll also be sharing
October report on the 19th as well that we will be getting as
well as talking about what we’ve been doing in November to meet
the recommendations of that work that was done in October. KATIE: Rhonda? RHONDA: Would it be possible for
the 19th that we would be able to have that information as well
as the public has it before we have an open session meeting? JOHN: Sure, I think that would
be well worth doing to that. RHONDA: Like on the
Friday prior to that? JOHN: Definitely. KATIE: In a regular packet. KRISTINA: When you come back
can you share some the needs the teachers have for support
outside of all of the things they are required to do. What are some of things that the
board can do to support them in the district? The term burnout is a
significant concern, I want to make sure
that were addressing that. CINDY: Can you give an example? KRISTINA: They want to–do
we think we should have staff appreciation day? Do they need to–I would look
to you to make those and for them to speak on their behalf. But you know, they have a
lot of heavy lifting to do. And it’s important to rally
around them and let them know were there for them as well. CINDY: Will bring you an example
some of things you’ve done. KRISTINA: Yeah. I’m sure you can
come up with something. CINDY: Some ideas. KATIE: Michelle? MICHELLE: Just want to add
last week was conferences, teacher–two weeks ago. And Cindy’s husband was
there bringing in a huge turkey roaster of chili and homemade
cornbread and a dessert item. So I mean, I think that’s, food
is very important to our culture and making people feel valued. So I was–I didn’t need any, but
I sure thought it looked good. CINDY: It was gone. KRISTINA: Also our food service
does a good job catering. MICHELLE: They do. KRISTINA: They can do it all for
you and so I am going to do a little plug for them here. CINDY: They are amazing. JOHN: They do a good job. I think that’s really important. And by asking for and pointing
out some of the needed changes in adult practice, I want to
reiterate and double down on the fact that it needs to be done
with support in a caring way. But when we’re expecting people
to change the way with we act, ourselves included, we have
to do so with compassion and support and respect. And that’s how we feel about all
of our educators at Washington. TAG: And I’d like to follow up
on that real quickly because it didn’t fit anywhere else in is
that both Doug and I have been very, very pleased with the
welcome that we’ve had and also teacher’s
willingness to try things. Doug hasn’t been back
since the last visit, but he gets up reports of
literacy strategies being used. I’ll suggest a method and
teachers try the method. So, you’ve got a great staff
there that’s willing to step out and give things a try. And if something
doesn’t work they’ll say, Tag, that didn’t
work, can you do this? The saying out. And I say, well let’s
try something else. But there really is a
willingness to try and we wanted to recognize that. I didn’t find any
other place to put it in, so put it in here. CINDY: Our teachers are amazing. KRISTINA: They are. KATIE: They are. Rhonda? RHONDA: Before we had actually
taken the proposal and voted on it, we had asked for
testimonials from other communities who had used AIR
as their turnaround partner and almost every testimonial that
was given to us should about a three, four year time span
before you actually saw a change. Is that what you
expect at Washington? That we are going to invest
about 3 to 4 years before we see a change as stated in the other
testimonials that we have been able to look at? TAG: Well, go ahead. KRISTINA: You know,
so, it all depends. That’s probably not the
answer you want to hear, right? It depends on the
capacity, the resources, the will and the commitment of
the people that are actually doing the work. Our role, and we see ourselves
as the capacity builders, system builders. So, it’s like any
program that you would, you know, participate in. You work as hard
as you work at it, you get the outcomes that as
much effort as you put into it. What we’ve seen and what
we’ve experienced with our other turnaround support efforts is
a gradual decrease of support needed by us. So in the first year
typically it’s intensive. You’ll see us a lot and will
be in communication a lot, and there be a lot of activities
that will be going on. Year two, usually you see it
dial down of support needed for the teachers, or
for the principal. Now, the support may look
different depending upon where we are, how well the
foundational pieces, the structures and process
get put into the first year, and are they coming back and
being operational in a really high-level in the second year? And then in the third year
usually it’s typically a very light touch because all
of those pieces at play. And we it’s like checking in
once a month or so that we come in and maybe provide
professional development, do the progress
monitoring piece to it. But really, our goal is to build
the capacity of the people here for there to be a local
commitment and ownership in an investment of it that takes the
school through the improvement process to sustainability, and
then we get to like call you up and get emails from you, read
about you in the newspaper and all your accolades. So, it all depends. JOHN: I think another important
piece to note is quite often there’s a success partner, it’s
because of something that might be mandated by the state or
because of lack of performance in certain areas. And when something is a force
change rather than a select change, it can
be–make a big difference. We us the analogy before
about weight loss and you know, changing diet and
changing exercise. If somebody is
forced to go to the gym, the way that they participate
there as opposing to choosing to go to the gym, we’re going
to have a different result. So I think that the active
participation by our teams and wanting to gain as much as
possible for sustainability and that knowledge there is going to
be something that’s going to be an accelerator for us as well. RHONDA: So, just a follow-up
it’s almost never just a year, the school year
and then you just. KRISTINA: Really it
depends on the district. If you invite us to come back,
we’ll come back and we’ll take another assessment of progress
to date and we’ll have another conversation around what are
the services and supports do you think that you need? We responded to an
RFP for this work. We’ll respond again if
another RFP comes out. So it’s really–if we
get invited to come back, we’ll get another conversation
around scope of work and deliverables and what seems to
make the most sense to support the work at the school. RHONDA: But right now what’s in
places for the school year only. CATHERINE: Correct. RHONDA: Okay. KATIE: Any other questions? Michelle. MICHELLE: Just a comment. I know there’s been a tremendous
amount of work and I think a real appreciation for everyone
at Washington Middle School. Some of the things that–and I
don’t know if you can bring that forward with the whole child,
but there have been some really great community parent pieces
that I’ve been fortunate to be part of. The first little
recital that was held, a lot of great
parents and family, community came. And a grandmother stood there
and said this is the best school ever for my granddaughter. So those are the
kinds of things, too. And even when you had
something in the cafeteria, I can’t remember what that was. It was for the fine
arts or something. But I do think that sometimes
those pieces don’t come forward and there’s a tremendous amount
of culture climate around–being built around that success. I have the
opportunity every week, and I don’t know if
the board gets this, that Pete Wear sends out and
shows his pictures and tells us stories about what’s
going on at Washington. It’s a different lens, but you
can see kids engaged a families often coming forward. So there’s a lot of those pieces
that have not come forward. But my hope, as you come each
month to bring some of that with you as well, because that really
addresses the whole child, but also the whole
school, you know. And there’s a lot of very
successful community members who went through Washington and went
through Howe school and see this as a pathway. So, I’m really grateful,
and just the other piece of anecdotal information as when I
was visiting last week in these last several
years when I visited, a teacher pulled me into the
classroom and sometimes they would always talk to
me about behavior. This time I had someone, in fact
a couple of teachers talking to me about their instruction,
and could we do some things differently to change that
instruction to leverage what they were trying to do? So that’s a
different conversation, too. So it tells me something is
changing and those really powerful stories. And so, it was
English-language arts. (laughter) MICHELLE: It wasn’t math, so
just from where I was standing. ANDREW: Just for
quick, this was, I’m guessing that it’s one of
the differences that we may have compared other
districts, but Tag, he even revisited in AIR. Just mentioning that, you
know, something that we I think, might take for granted
in Green Bay that hey, I saw people doing some
people building maintenance, custodial work during the day
instead of just before and after school. And I think that’s something
that I would venture to guess in many places that you go there’s
probably contracted out cleaning in the majority
of them is likely. And that’s–that’s
a good compliment, both to our staff, our custodial
staff that you have coming from the outside. You notice and appreciate it. It’s also, again, not that
we brought you in for this, but it’s an acknowledgment
from someone who’s seen a lot of other ways things can be done to
have your own sense of ownership in your buildings is important. Obviously that was
something that you noticed, so thank you. KATIE: Any other questions? Hearing none, thank you
very much for coming. We might want to allow more than
30 minutes for the next one. JOHN: Yeah, so we can relate to
the next steps we’ll continue to work on enhancing communication,
consider next steps from possible mid-year
co-interpretation, and I just wanted to say again,
the efforts at Washington are deeper opportunity
for all of us to learn. We continue to capture AIR best
practices of change acceleration for support and turnaround to
build our capacity to serve all schools were trajectory change
is needed to maximize student potential. We changed our hiring practices,
we’re getting better about thinking about
defining metrics of success, more focused efforts
around student walk through. These are things that will
pay off not just at Washington, but throughout the district. I want to say thanks especially
to Cindy and her team who has been a rock star and one of the
hardest working people with the biggest heart that I know. So thank you. CINDY: It’s not me
alone, that’s for sure. Thank you. KATIE: I do see someone in
the audience with his hand up. And I just we’re not really
set up for this kind of a forum, but don’t feel comfortable. ROB: Want me to ask
the question here? KATIE: Go ahead and say your
question and then I will ask the question. ROB: Well that’s okay. I spent, just for background, I
spent last year as a volunteer Washington Middle School
probably four hours a week during the first semester and
two hours a week for the second semester. And it is indeed a very daunting
task to turn the school around. I mean, I quite agree. And I don’t have the solutions. But–and the other volunteers
that were there were unanimous at the level of disruption in
and out of the classroom was just unbelievable. And you know, I
know the referrals, and is quite remarkable. And I’m just
wondering if in fact, the level of violence
and fighting has declined. I’m aware that two of your staff
members were sent to urgent care in a fracas with students. You know, just because you’re
not making referrals doesn’t mean that the level of violence
and disruption has necessarily declined. Can somebody speak
to that to a point? Are the records about
police contacts for example? Nobody wants to
speak to that point? It’s not a rhetorical question. MICHELLE: How do you
want us to respond? I mean, we can engage. ED: Respond as best you
can to that question. CINDY: I was not here
last year, you know that. ROB: Yes. I am aware of that. CINDY: So I don’t know what
level of violence there was last year. But just like as happens that
other middle schools that I’ve worked in another middle
schools that I’ve been in, we have occasion where students
get into disagreements and it becomes physical. Has that happened this year
at Washington Middle School? It absolutely has. Do I like it? I absolutely don’t. Do we take it very seriously? We absolutely do. Fighting is not anything that
we tolerate and just walk away from. It creates unsafe environments
for the two students involved, or more than two
students involved. Everybody around and
unfortunately the fallout usually comes to staff because
there’s not a staff member in our school that–I don’t think
there’s a staff member in our school that would stand
by and watch it happen. And so, they feel that
obligation to protect children. So, I’m not gonna comment on how
many staff were injured or if staff were injured
because I think that’s personal information for
those staff, however, is it a big deal? It’s a big deal. And do we like it? We absolutely don’t. ROB: Well– KATIE: Rob, I’m going to have to
cut you off now. ROB: One question? KATIE: One question. ROB: Okay, very good. KATIE: We’re gonna
pause for break. Five minute break? (Inaudibile conversation) BRENDA: All right,
get started again, everybody’s back. Go ahead, Katie. KATIE: All right, Chris is
about to do this in less than 15 minutes. School safety and
security update. VICKI: Good afternoon. Actually here– MICHELLE: Good afternoon? VICKI: Oh, did I say that? MICHELLE: Yes. (laughter) VICKI: Good morning. It’s closer to morning. KATIE: Very good. VICKI: We are here this evening
to provide the board with an update on three
different topics, one is the school safety grant
which you have been made aware of for the second round. The other is an update on
school safety communication. And then finally what our
recommendations are going to be moving forward
with the SRO program. So, I’m going to start with
Chris Collar talking about the safety grants, please. CHRIS: Hello, everyone. So just a quick update,
round two of the school safety initiatives. The district
was awarded $1,180,184 and what we’re going
to be doing with that money is we’re going to purchase
additional security cameras more than what we purchased
with around one of the grant. We’re going to be looking to put
security resistance film on all doors of all the schools that
didn’t get it from round one. We’re going to put in a new
master key system to make the exterior doors of our buildings
so we can have better key control. We’re going to be purchasing
some trauma first aid kits for all the schools that would
help in major emergencies. We’re going to be producing
three-story escape ladders to be used in second and third
story classrooms for use, obviously, for
fire-related issues, but also if we did have an
active shooter type situation one of the buildings. We are looking to update the
software and configuration of the current radios that we
have, the portable radios, in addition to the ones that we
purchase from round one of the grant. We are looking to put a secured
entrance at the Minoka Hill School. We’re looking to do some
additional PA system upgrades, and then that money can be used
to pay for any camera cost that we did not cover in round one
as later on I was explained we’re doing an RFP, if costs are
higher than what we originally believed, we can use the
round two money to offset that. As part of both of the grants,
they do not come without some training requirements. Round one required three hours
of trauma training for all of our staff, round two is
requiring that 10% of our full-time teaching staff and
administrators are required to attend a 12-hour
adolescent mental health course. The state–that is
about 176 staff members. We’ve set aside budget from the
grant funding to send 200 our staff members to this training. We’ve also been required
to create school safety and intervention teams and have
members of those teams trained in threat assessments. And we set aside money to pay
150 staff members to attend thar threat assessment team training. So those trainings will be, the
threat assessment team and the adolescent mental health
training teams are will be posted here in our
district next year. We will be doing two classes of
50 staff members of the 12 hours of mental health training. And we will be hosting at
least one course of 150, whether it be all of her staff
our staff another district or area school districts that can
come and attend that course. We have–we’re in the process
of completing that mandatory reporting on threats of school
violence training that’s been shared with all of our staff,
and we are somewhere within the 80% of our staff have completed
that training to this point. The next steps that we are
moving forward with on November 19, I’ll be bringing forward
the information on our RFP the request for proposal on the
security camera grant so that we can move forward with the
starting of that project. And then later on in December we
are nearing the stretch run of our 50 site assessments
that we had to do this year. So you’ll have a report of all
of the student assessments in December for review to be in
compliance with the act 143 requirements along with any
updates that we would need to make to our safety
and security binder, again, will be coming in
December so that we can be in compliance with the January 1
requirement for all those plans to be in place. VICKI: Just for clarification
all schools already do have a school safety team. So when Chris mentions school
safety intervention team are going to be created, it’s just
a change in the name plus the addition of an SRO which is
a requirement of the grant. They weren’t part
of our teams before. (Inaudible) CHRIS: Yes, what the state is
required is under this as SIT teams, the school
safety intervention teams. You should have at
least one administrator, one mental health professional
whether it be counselor or psychologist, and there should
be law enforcement involvement in it. So when we do threar assessments
those people should all be involved. KRISTINA: So, Michelle,
I’m coming into the late, I understand. And I know there’s a grant,
and I understand that there are grant requirements. Do we have a guiding document
that communicates what our commitment is to safety to
sort of provide the foundational expectation for how
we’re going to do this work? Because what
I’m–does that make sense? It would help me to understand
that if we’re going to be, for example, by putting
surveillance cameras in. Okay, we’re going to do that. Okay, but our commitment is
we’re going to intentionally do that in a way that so the kids
do not feel like they’re being watched, right? That’s part of the work. Do we have any sort of guiding
document for this work that would help to explain the lens
through which we are addressing school safety? VICKI: Outside of the
school safety binder, which I need to make sure
you’re able to see that. Not that I’m aware of that
specifically lays out what I think you’re asking for. KRISTINA: I just think that we
can be helpful for the community and to make sure that were we
help make decisions is actually grounded into what a
deeper understanding what our commitment is to students. VICKI: Would that
be board policy? ED: There’s board policy round
it and again with not just with the grant, but whether you’re
a grant recipient or not think there’s like you can count
on the number one hand of the number districts, in the
districts that did not apply for the grant. There’s a requirement that
every district have an emergency operation plan that
addresses prevention, protection,
mitigation, response, and recovery. So as far as the
foundation, you know, you’ve got it in one at 1807
saying what you have to have in place. Now as far as operationally you
look at each of those five areas and then it’s up
to the district. There are, there’s guidance,
there’s a lot of guidance from FEMA, from the state as well
that says these are the kind of things that you want to have in
place to address each of these five critical areas. So, I think you’ll find it in
the emergency operations plan that the district has. And then going back and
get into what that based on? KRISTINA: And I totally
appreciate you giving that feedback because I know that’s
an area that you know deeply about. I’m thinking about it
almost of like a Bill of Rights, like this is what we
commit to–because again, I know we just
started this conversation, I don’t want to
get into the weeds. My hairs stick up on my arm when
we talk about this because it can go into very
deep, dark place right, because it feels
very restrictive. And I think it’s important for
us to be able to demonstrate to our community that were
going to do what we need to do, the expectations of
the grant or whatever, but at the same time were
balancing that with the recognition that we’re
doing what’s best for kids. Does that make sense, Michelle? MICHELLE: Yeah, I think it makes
very good sense and I know that when we do, we’ve done safety
audits to make sure that we have the resources in place
to be in compliance. And even you see those pieces
and I understand having thought and listen to other
superintendents in terms of when tough decisions are made and you
have varied perspectives to have those lenses. Often they come in board policy. And so, maybe — VICKI: That’s next. KRISTINA: That’s next okay. MELISSA: This is in the board
policy that’s been proposed today. KRISTINA: Yeah, I don’t want to
bore–I want something that we can share with the community. MICHELLE: Right, but
that’s a governance, that says that’s our direction,
that’s a beacon of light that says follow that star. So again, it does go back to the
board policy and then of course state statute that
really drives that. From where that is
my understanding. I think the other piece, too,
though is that the document itself really tells the story
of the philosophy when you read through the
safety of the Redbook, you can really see where the
thinking has gone in the past and just the different pieces of
how things are handled you know, whether it be a student
threat or the passing of student tragically, or the
passing of staff. It’s all in there and you start
to see the different frames within that in terms of
where the district has gone. Is there an
outward facing document? Nothing I’m aware of besides
policy that really is that lens that really sets the
course of moving us forward. KRISTINA: I just like, would
like to go on the record and say I think we need to
have something like that. I think we need to have one,
something that demonstrates our commitment to balancing this
with what we know is needed for kids. And I think those documents
are really great, Michelle. I think policy is really
great, guides our work, but it’s not what works for
community members and parents to understand why we do what we do. And so, we don’t have to
make that decision today. I just think that would be
really helpful because people want to know why we’re making
the decisions that we are. We should be able to communicate
to that in a very clear way. That’s all. VICKI: No problem. I don’t know if Chris will
say this is true or not, but as I look at the
list of the actual, physical items we’re
purchasing because of the grant, these are all
things all the trauma, the kids probably
we’re in there either, but the audits are done
in the past 10 years, the things relisted on there’s
request from school to increase the safety. KRISTINA: Again I think we can
say that we want–we can address that, but we also need to say
that were committed to kids so we’re not going to literally
shut down their learning. There’s a balance in it. There’s a balance in the work. VICKI: Hopefully
we’re maintaining that. KRISTINA: Well, I don’t know. CHRIS: With anything I would say
that added to the security of the school would enhance the
environment and make them feel comfortable and safe that they
would not have to worry about things happening in their
building and not have to worry if someone is
coming to the door. KRISTINA: I think
that’s a good point though, and that’s where I would like
to philosophically know what everybody believes
when we say safety. Because I was actually disagree
with you on what–how people feel about that. I mean, the school to prison
pipeline is a real thing and there is–there are actually
research-based outcomes when we push too far to lock it down. So, there’s a place
in which that is. There’s a tipping point. Where we manufacture fear. ED: I think if you
look at these things, and I know exactly what
you’re talking about and I agree with you. These are very unobtrusive. I mean if you’re
talking about the cameras, I mean, they’re discreet and
the more forensic than anything else. They’re not used for
surveillance and nobody sitting there, you know, watching to see
if Ed Dorff is smoking the boy’s room. I mean, that’s not happening. And I read some of
the things that you, you know, particularly
some studies that came out of California. The effect on learning about
things like barbed wire fences around schools and
metal detectors have had. And there are unfortunately
there are districts that have that and thank God
we’re not one of them. Let’s take a look at
what we’re talking about, radios for
communication, you know, then resistant
glass, laminate’s, very unobtrusive. I would be interested knowing
what other things you might have around the things it got there. Because I don’t see anything
here that should have any negative impact on learning. KRISTINA: Sure. But I’m just saying we can do a
better job getting out in front of that. If that’s the truth and
we’re not watching people. I mean, it says here
additional security cameras. I think people have concerns
about what that actually means. Who’s watching it,
who has access to that? You know, that film or
whatever calling it. But this can just be a very
slippery slope and I think we need to help the community
understand why we’re doing and how we’re doing it. RHONDA: I have a question. KATIE: Rhonda. RHONDA: You mentioned for
the grant the school security team was renamed. CHRIS: Yeah. RHONDA: And then he mentioned
that there has to be an officer, school police officer. CHRIS: That’s a
part of the team, yes. RHONDA: So, are we implementing
this as part of the grant and part of the requirement, do
we have to have these teams in every single school? Are we now including
elementary schools as well? CHRIS: Yes, they have
to be in every school. We can have one team
cover multiple schools, but I believe how we’ll do it is
each school have a team and then either an SRO would be assigned
to be a part of that team depending on the area
that they’re going yet. RHONDA: When you say team is
this just a team that gets together meets about safety, or
is it an actual presence in the school? VICKI: It’s a team that’s made
above we do have a counselors social worker, oftentimes both. The building principal, APs,
sometimes teachers are involved, but sometimes meetings typically
happen during school day, so the only addition that I
know of right now would be just including an officer. CHRIS: And the answer I guess we
kind of both because it wouldn’t be specific to one thing. I mean, they would be used for
many things that we have them now and how it relates to doing
safety drills for students in crisis. But, the specific focus of these
teams has to do with threat assessments. So if there are
threats at the school, then these teams are involved in
the threat assessment process of that. So, an SRO might not be involved
in every aspect of the safety team is a part of
on a daily basis, but when they’re talking about
specific threat assessments, they need to be a part of that. And yes, those teams are
required to meet at least quarterly and discuss you know
how they are gonna be working on things or if there is different
activities going on a different buildings or that
building that they work on. They’re multilevel. There is not the same group all
the time because you could have a counselor that’s in that
school one or two days a week and then psychologist
one or two days a week. And then, someone else and
they’re all a part of that team at the there are lots
at different times, so we can change. RHONDA: Okay, thank you. So, are we going to,
for the elementary level, are we going to pull school
police officer from a middle and high school to come into there,
or is this an actual–with this safety team do we have to now
hire an additional officer? CHRIS: No. If we can’t have a access to
the school resource officer and there’s an imminent need,
we call either emergency and nonemergency and one of the
patrol officers come to the school and they would
work to that capacity. RHONDA: So just so I’m clear,
so these teams that are in the elementary schools, the officer
that’s part of that team is going to be coming
from another location, it’s not been to be an
officer now in the school. VICKI: We already have SROs
that are assigned to quads, so it’s our K-12 buildings. That’s our existing SROs. RHONDA: Since over
there right now? With the grant
they’re not adding? CHRIS: We cannot add
SROs as part of the grant. ED: As I look at that
particular process, there’s absolutely nothing new
in there as far as the way we been operating. We’ve had, call it a risk
assessment a students assistance team is basically what it is. We have those in place for
years and years and years. We can go to protocol, there’s
been a protocol in our safety security binder, again, for many
years that address assessing threats. And I’m not even crazy about
that language because when DOJ talks about threat assessment
and they talk about having law enforcement, the talking
about the worst-case scenarios. They’re talking
about potential shooter, that sort of thing. To be effective, I think these
teams are effective because they look at all manner of, you
know, students in crisis, what’s going on. And again I think in terms of
the student assistance team. That’s basically what it is. And really the only time you’re
going to involve law enforcement is when you’ve got a
concern about kid with a weapon, or gonna harm somebody. And there’s nothing new there. I mean, that’s the
way we been operating. KRISTINA: So to go on that, and
I’m glad you brought that up, is that actually the only times
we bring in a school police officer? I mean that is as an honest
question because I recently heard from a parent in the
district to has a nine-year-old, fourth-grader, who has a
documented behavioral disability and had the school–and I’m
not gonna call them a school resource officer. I don’t personally
don’t like that. I know that’s the
language in this like document. I think it normalizes it
and it sanitizes it for me. I’m just going to be
honest with you guys. Is that what we want to do? Do we want to call a school
police officer and to deal with–and this child was
not–and I agree with you, I think there are times that
we need–the threat is real. We need to bring them in. And I asked this honestly. Is that what we want to do? Because this plan,
when I read this plan, is a double down on creating a
system where we are going to see more kids get caught up in
the policing of our community. ED: Obviously I don’t know what
situation is at the nine-year-old there, but if it’s
up behavioral issue in school, it should be dealt
with in the school. KRISTINA: Right, but as we… ED: But as we clarified that you
bring law enforcement and when it’s an issue for
law enforcement. Not what is an
issue for school rules. KRISTINA: But as we
expand this program, we are looking toward law
enforcement to do more of that work. ED: No. KRISTINA: It shifts away. It does. Here’s the deal, last year we
just had a–there’s a recent research that came out that will
we have a 2.6% increase in our Wisconsin prison population. 2.6%. Our black students are two times
more likely than white students to receive a referral or be
arrested by law enforcement. By most markers Wisconsin is the
worst state for black students. And we know that these
things–and I’m being honest in here. I don’t see any equity and I’m
wondering where the lenses when we do this work for we honor the
fact that we have students that we know through the research are
going to be disproportionately impacted by these as we
double down and as we expand. And I’m just being honest and
I’m being courageous I’m telling you about my concerns are. BRENDA: So give me an example
if you were to make this your perfect document, what
would be in here that would representative of that? KRISTINA: It would be to not be
expanding and working with the Green Bay Police Department as
part–is bringing them in and having SROs do our disciplining. They are. BRENDA: Where does the say that? Because we had a
very intentional, probably three, four years
ago, where we were having some trouble with that and we made
very clear the delineation of what administrators are, should
be calling the police officers for help and also the fact that
the police officers do not come in unless they’ve been
invited by the administrators. KRISTINA: Correct. BRENDA: I don’t have
that of 100% you know, happens that way every time, but
that’s what we changed because we knew that was part
of our equity problem. KRISTINA: But they’re there,
they’re being invited in and it’s still happening. And I’m not saying this
because I think anybody’s bad. I think we’re all here for kids. You guys were in this together. We believe in this district. This is not a personal–I’m
concerned about our kids and especially looking
at the statistics. And as we expand and get more
money from the state and what it means for us in the
direction we have to go, I’m really asking us like are
we committed to this and is this what we want to do and is
this what’s best for kids? That’s a question I’m
asking and it’s not personal. I like all of you personally. VICKI: Don’t take it personally. Just a comment on the incident. Of course, we
can’t talk specifics. But the direction administrators
having given is that the police are called and if
this–of its harm to themselves, the students themselves or
to others that’s beyond their ability to manage his in
the administrative team. KRISTINA: For a fourth grader? And I’ll tell you what the
police officer also said that he was going to need to handcuff
the fourth-grader until the parent got there. So, I’m sharing this again not
to throw anybody under the bus, but highlight why I am concerned
about the work that we’re doing. VICKI: Understood. KRISTINA: Thank you. KATIE: Andrew. ANDREW: So just to
clarify, Kristina. We have–so I
would–if we were picking, you know, I think I’ve gotten
valuable input on things from our school police
officers and many cases, sometimes I agree,
sometimes I haven’t. If it were up to me on how
school districts, you know, state managed, you know,
state issued security grants would go, I’ve always–no
surprise to anyone that I think school districts should be
able to have who they feel appropriate to have
on the committees, maybe have a school
resource officer maybe not. But we don’t have that choice. So, if you want to get the
million dollars of round two, we have to do that. But given that it seems
that to me I would have to agree with Ed. It seems to me if you looking
deeper into the SRO situation, but I mean as far as the grants,
and is there anything you see problematic there? KRISTINA: Well, I think you
bring up a good point that a lot of it is driven
down by the system, right? I mean, you’re kind of put in
the position of either you take the money or you don’t. ANDREW: There’s things we
could buy that would make us, the school feel very unwelcoming
in the name of security, and those aren’t it. I’m not–and there’s a lot of
things that we could buy that I would think, let’s not do that. KRISTINA: Sure, sure, sure. ANDREW: But I think we’re
picking pretty smart things, technology solutions. Not that I don’t have, but if
this update is also about the overall, relationships
with SROs and is doing what, I think I would share some of
your concern probably there. I just don’t have concerns about
what I see on the grant items list here. KATIE: Michelle. MICHELLE: If you look at the
district recommendations for consideration, at the very
end, I think one of the pieces, because we continue to meet on
a pretty regular basis with the police department. And the responsiveness
particularly from the chief has been very good in terms
of having conversations, and these very conversations
about the role of a police officer in our schools and
the recognition that we are not really interested in making
sure that our schools are safe, that’s a huge priority, the
safety of each and every child. But also not wanting to
create an environment that is so intrusive that it feels like
you’re not in school anymore. So, that’s a very
important part of that. One of the things if you
read in the last bullet, or the last point, and I
don’t know if it’s up there, it talks about how we’re are
going to collaborate to really do a deeper dive into the school
resource officers in terms of making sure that the program
evaluation is in partnership with and it talks about looking
at that scope of the evaluation and making sure that, you know,
that the effectiveness of the actions taken to implement
the goals that we have shared. And I think one of the things
that when I’m fortunate to be in schools at times where I
see huge value in the school resource officer being
present and supporting a safety environment that
doesn’t feel intrusive, but it is needed at
that point in time. It’s just a timely thing where
that resource officer just may be present and in it and it
works out very well for the safety and well-being of the
student and the school and other students as well. So–but really looking at how
do we ensure that we have that? And I think it goes back to what
we’re saying about our public. It goes back to
making sure it’s positive, safe, and supportive of the
school climate as intended as opposed to a negative
in that school climate. So, that evaluation will be
very important and certainly the board can be–is going to hear
that report and make decisions from that report. KATIE: Rhonda? RHONDA: So, I think it’s very
important to recognize that even though a lot of us may feel
safer seeing the presence of police officer, there a lot of
people in our community that that is actually the does
the exact opposite thing. I think we have to recognize
that and I that our version of safety is not theirs. And I think when we
talk about collaborating, looking into–I have a
lot of questions about this conversation in general
that we’re discussing. The Green Bay Police Department
in an analytical review of themselves, which is
interesting on its own, says that they did an analytical
review of efficiency and efficacy with how they are
operating in the schools. What is the–I mean, did
they–and how do they actually come to those conclusions? What did they use? Do we share data with
them, with their students? Did they really, actually
objectively review themselves? And if that’s what they’re doing
and there were collaborating with them, I would hope that
right off the bat that there are a lot of questions about that
because I think if you look into the community, I think you may
have concerns about the Green Bay Police Department. I know I do. So, I’d like to think that we’re
going to be pretty–were going to command this collaboration,
we’re not gonna let them drive it. Because right now their–based
on their analytical review, they want us to invest
in training for them, they want us to
increase officers, 3 to 4 in elementary schools,
and they want additional data collection. When I see these things, I hope
that’s not just something that they just get to have. It’s nice that they
want all of these things, but… I think at the end of the day
that that specifically–I’m very unnerved by that especially the
fact that police department does its own review. Unless I’m reading that wrong. I think that’s very interesting,
and if we’re considering collaborating with
them at this point, for I’m not sure what, if
anything I would say we’re going to have police
officers in our schools, we should be deciding
who’s going to evaluate them. And we should be
actually doing that. It shouldn’t be something
that they do themselves. VICKI: Yes, ma’am, that’s
exactly what number five is. RHONDA: Okay, but
that’s–it’s… VICKI: I think the
word collaborate. RHONDA: Collaborate, yeah,
maybe that’s what it is. It’s really
interesting in itself. Of all the things we
need to do every day, yeah. In the development of an
oversight committee to review the school
resource officer program, I just–I have a lot of concerns
about the police policing themselves, personally. You know, we have an
increase of expulsions, a significant
increase this year, and so, when I see even–the
fact that we’ve been spending time talking about this, it
really concerns me a lot. And I’m not sure who’s going to
be on this oversight committee. I sure would love to be. VICKI: May I? RHONDA: Yeah, that’s it, just
wanted to share because you mentioned that. And that’s where
all my concerns are, it’s all in that whole– VICKI: We’re looking
for guidance from the board, which is why
we’re bringing this to you. Number one, the development
of the oversight committee, were looking for
board members, parents, staff, administrators, and then
getting feedback from students as well. The focus will be to
look at the purpose, goals, and measures. The collaboration for
supervision and communication improvement, it’s been noted
to be an issue this year in particular. So we want to improve upon that. For the SRO’s training, we felt
for very long time that it would be beneficial if police officers
in our schools have the same trainings as our staff are
receiving for a variety of reasons. So we would welcome them to
the trainings that our staff are already receiving. The data collection is focused
on how are we measuring the purpose of the program
in its successfulness. So that’s where we would need to
collaborate with the sharing of data. And then lastly, yes, they
did a program evaluation. We want to do our own so, we’re
going to seek the assistance from Dr. Stramp to facilitate an
evaluation of the program before we make any changes– MICHELLE: Which will
bring forward? VICKI:–which would be a
consideration of including order, not including more staff. RHONDA: I can imagine
their review is public. VICKI: Yes, ma’am,
that was shared with you. RHONDA: And she
had mentioned that. I don’t remember,
just I missed it. I’m not saying
you didn’t send it. I just missed it. VICKI: Should I resend? RHONDA: The great. Yeah, thank you. KRISTINA: Do
you have specific guidance, Vicki, and language around
what school police officers, very clear guidance on when
they are responsible for getting involved? VICKI: The two
circumstances I shared earlier. Harm to self or others. But they have to be called in
by admin before they step in. MICHELLE: I believe that,
is that in the contract, Melissa, it is, isn’t it? KRISTINA: There’s a
lot of gray area though. I mean, there’s
going to be gray area, I get it, it’s not
gonna be black and white. We need to be moving away as
much as possible from having our school police officers
being responsible for school discipline. My concern is, my concern is
and I’m not saying anybody disagrees. I’m not saying that. I’m like going rogue here, but
that needs to be a commitment to our community. It needs to be a commitment. And we need to be
sharing that to people. CHRIS: I think it would we have
shared that with administrators. It’s been a focus since I’ve
been here to make sure that they understand what the
purpose of the SRO is, what they, when they
should be utilizing, when they shouldn’t. And I think there’s
been a shift in that. We’ve been pulling them out of
situations that they shouldn’t of been involved in
in the first place. KRISTINA: I
appreciate that, Chris. Because what I’m hearing from
what I’m talking with people is that they’re
feeling the opposite. I’m not saying what
you’re saying isn’t it true. I total–but people are
concerned and when you hear about teachers feeling like
that’s what they need to do. CHRIS: I think one of
the part of the issue. KRISTINA: I think that’s
their first line of defense. Again this is just
what I’m hearing. That’s a concern for me. CHRIS: I think what could be
part of the problem is you have your SROs, which
we have 11 of them. And if they are not available
we’re bringing officers off the street, which are
different than our SROs. So, the scenario that you were
explaining makes me think there wasn’t an SRO that
was involved with it. It was an officer off the street
who may not work in the same capacity that our SROs and
may not understand how school opportunities function. KRISTINA: It was an SRO. It as an SRO. Again, I believe
you’re doing good work. But it is concerning to me. RHONDA: Should we collaborate? KATIE: Michelle. Go ahead? RHONDA: Go ahead. MICHELLE: The piece I want to
be sure of in the first bullet point, Vicki, is you
talked about the committee representation. And to Rhonda’s point, I don’t
want the lost having been just recently in a couple of
places and having those same conversations about
the fears and concerns. And I’ve talked to mothers who
are very worried about their sons being pulled
over and so forth. And I just think that is
a very important voice. You know, and I do think, I
think Kristina you said it, it’s about balance, it’s about
making sure that we have the resources and supports in place
to be able to be responsive in a crisis or safety need as well at
the same time making sure that were respecting and supporting
each and every child is served. So I think it’s really important
to make sure all voices are in that group. That would be really good. I have a name for
you at least one. KATIE: Okay. RHONDA: Okay, so if we are going
to collaborate and get together and have this think
tank about adding, subtracting, shifting whatever
the police presence that we have in our schools
and you mentioned, there might be times when
there’s another officer that comes in off the street and they
don’t have the same approach or possibly, that’s a huge
conversation to have about the fact that with the police
department if we’re going to–if you have officers
coming to our schools, understand that
there’s expectations. I mean, that is something
I think the chief has to reiterate. And I’m hopeful that with
this collaboration that we can mention that because I have
heard other things as well where it’s, you know, throwing a kid
to the ground in handcuffs in front of the school when parents
are picking up their students is a really shocking and offensive
thing to see on school grounds. And even if you–it makes you
think about safety in the aspect of well, this school wasn’t
even safe because look at that. I feel like it’s
an episode of “Cops”. You know, they need to make
sure when they come in they’re handling our students
that they remember, I don’t know, I think there’s
like this big free range for them to just handle
something, and is just, you know, is
basically what they do. And it’s I don’t
know, there’s definitely, I think we need to discover what
we know and what we feel like the word safety really and truly
means because that’s something that we all feel here and is
not necessarily the way the community is looking at it. And somehow we have to–and
when we looked at those two engagement sessions that we had
after the press conference with the chief, if you looked at
all–everything the people writing down on
this pieces of paper, it really, it told the story
that the community really wants to be welcome, and they want
to feel like a warm welcome. They don’t want to feel
like they’re being policed. And especially with an
admin calls the student, or calls a police
officer for student, an if that student
is undocumented, what did we just do? And I think we have to
think about really what, who are community is
before we start just, you know, calling officers. And how are we getting to
that point in the first place? Because it could happen that we
just helped deport a student. I don’t know. VICKI: There’s a lot of
ramifications for those decisions. RHONDA: There are. There are a lot of unintended
consequences that I hope that when we do this collaboration
that we really think about when we move forward. And you might think everything I
said exactly the way I said it. But again, I would like to go
on record saying that of all the things we really
need for safety, when I think about safety
I think about not what–if something happens, it’s
what is literally happening. What are we doing to invest in
these kids while there in the building? First, before waving people in. I’m done. KATIE: Okay. ANDREW: Laura. KATIE: Laura, sorry. LAURA: I’m not sure
who to address this to, but I’ll address
it to you, Vicki. Can you speak a
little bit about what, how teachers that you come
in contact with in your, you know, you’re in
schools all the time. How teachers feel
about the SROs. Do you get feedback
from teachers on that? VICKI: Teachers
and administrators? LAURA: Can you speak to us
a little bit about that? VICKI: My experience is
that ther’re only called in, in extreme situations where the
admin no longer feels like they can control the
situation and ensure safety. Teachers are okay with that. I don’t know how else to say it. LAURA: Thank you. KATIE: Andrew. ANDREW: I think what’s important
to me and I think there’s probably, when it comes right
down to it I would be willing to guess, but I’m just an
independent elected official, but I bet the seven of us are
probably not wildly far part about issues such
as over policing. I think if–I would think it
very likely that none of us want that. I think what I would like to
see though is that it is kind of weird, not weird in the
sense of unexpected because it’s completely expected that you
have the police department who has us paying for 11 of their,
11 officers that they hire and they control, we have
some limited input to this. But that one of the
recommendations from their internal review is would like
to increase our staff by 3 to 4 with your money. Now, that’s, and maybe that’s
the number they think that’s right, but it’s not, it’s not
as strong of a recommendation as were so committed
to this program, we’re going to add
three on our expense, right? It wasn’t that, so it’s a
lot–it’s really easy to recommend that if you’re writing
your own proposal and with another agency’s money. So, given that, you know, I
would like to see if we’re paying for all the salaries,
however it happens behind the scenes, whatever legal
things have to be worked out, when we would react this I want
more district control over the program, and I want more
district control over the people in the event. And I’m not saying that I know
of any times this is happening, but if there is an officer that
for whatever reason we don’t want to be in SRO anymore, I
think we need to have the right to have that
person not be an SRO. They might be–someone might end
up in an SRO position and for one reason or another we might
decide as we see fit as the district that they
not be one anymore. Then great, they’re a city
of Green Bay police officer. They can, might be a great
officer doing something else and not being a SRO. That’s what is important for me. I want to see that control so
that when I see–I don’t want there to be a situation that
will come to us and only for me to hear that unfortunately
due to the regulations we can’t reassign them or move. ED: I believe that has happened. KATIE: That has happened. ANDREW: But probably only
because they agree to it. I mean, we can call
the shots, can we? MELISSA: I’m looking. ANDREW: Okay. KATIE: On the meantime I think
if we–as I’m rereading the district recommendations
and considerations, I think putting this plan in
action will get us to where we’ve all
discussed we want to be. MICHELLE: That was the intent. KATIE: And I think we can
address everyone’s concerns if as a board we approve these. RHONDA: I have a
question though. What was the reason? What was the reason? Do we have some to
review themselves? Did they review
themselves and say here, we want to put 3 or
4 more officers in? How did this even happen and
where did this come from and why are we talking about it? VICKI: Yeah, I was
approached by Captain Murawski. I want to say it
was maybe February, March, about last time the
program had been evaluated in. It’s been quite a while
for a formal evaluation. And I shared with him at the
time that we didn’t have the capacity to embark on such a big
project because as you know we take a researcher programs
very seriously in its extensive. So they chose to move forward
with a less formal evaluation. No written surveys, but written
interviews of administrators and the SROs themselves. We felt we could do more
extensive job of it by having Dr. Stramp help us
out moving forward. RHONDA: Yeah, so when I–when
we talk about that I think about parents as well. VICKI: Right, and students. A diverse student population,
to your point earlier. KATIE: The various
stakeholder groups. Michelle? MICHELLE: I think
one of the things, and we’ve had many conversations
with the chief and the team about some of the concerns that
are being raised here at the table. I think that the piece that I
hear is that especially with the chief in particular is I believe
he’s open to some changes, at least going down that road. That’s my take away. I–the conversation about
who should be a school resource officer and who shouldn’t,
because we have school resource officers in our schools that are
seen as a really very positive. You can watch it
because the kids interact. Everyone’s in it. It just feels like
part of the team. And that walk out to be part of
the school and they understand the nuances of the schools and
they often have the history of families and can intervene and
very positive ways to support that school. And so, that’s the piece
that we’ve talked about is not everyone because it looks like a
good job should have that good job. Because it’s a very different
job than being a police officer on the beat. It’s a nice job. To be able to
interact with families. But it takes a special, in my
experience it takes special characteristics, qualities. And I believe that
we are very involved, correct me if I’m
wrong with Menoka, with the police liaison
officer that participated, or is currently at
Menoka because of the special circumstance. But each child in
each school is unique. So, you know,
that kind of effort. VICKI: We did revamp the way
that we hire SROs in the past. The police department maintained
the larger number of the panel. Now the district does. That was about three years
ago that we put that in place. Also, the length of time that
the officer has been an officer was always one of the highest
raters on whether that person can be in a SRO or not. We made modifications to that. It does still play a role
but not as significant. Instead we take them through
some scenarios and use a rubric to rate how they would perform
in certain situations involving our schools. And that weighs the heaviest
portion and whether that person will become an employee. KRISTINA: I just want
to go back to Michelle, what you were saying. You know, I think there’s always
going to be good people doing good work. Right, there’s
great police officers, there’s great
SROs, there’s great, you know–but and I
say this all the time, form follows function. When we hire more SROs, they do
the work through the lens of an SRO. That’s what lens is,
that’s who they are. That’s what they
been trained to do. But you know you can do all
the things that you just said, Michelle, which I
think are great points? Relationship
building, crisis management, identifying, and you know,
when there could be a problem. You know you can do
all those things? And I know it doesn’t
fit into the budget, John, so I know you’re not
you’re going to jump in and say we can’t. But you know he
can do those things? Community intervention
workers, social aides, counselors, and social workers. And those people are not going
to be doing their job through the lens of police training. And so, I just think it’s
very important that when we, again, I’m not saying SROs are
bad people are police ads doing the job through the lens
in which they’re doing it. And I think we need to be
committed to recognizing that form follows function. And when we we have increasing
inequities in our discipline statistics, we need to look at
what we’re doing and what we’re contributing or not
contributing to those practices. That’s all I’m going to say. KATIE: Any other
questions or comments? CHRIS: The last pieces, we’re
always working on improving communication during school
safety and security events. So I’d like to turn it over to
Lori Blakeslee to talk a little bit about the current
practice and how we work towards improving. LORI: So I’m going to be sharing
a table with you some proposed ideas. So I shared in the
document our currents, where things currently are. And to give you also some the
parameters around which we work, I think it’s important to
recognize that my department does take equity
very seriously, and so, that is one of the things we
look at when we think about how do we communicate to families
when there is a situation. So I did share with you some
data regarding primary languages and how many identified in the
various areas as their primary language that the
primary the family speaks. As well is the fact that all
not all households have email, which we’ve known. And so there’s about 1,500
families that currently don’t have an email address. So when we think about how do
we reach families when there’s a situation that’s occurring. I always say that
we can be fast, but we can’t be
fast and equitable. That doesn’t happen. It’s a resource issue. In my department we
are very fortunate. We also made it a priority
when we hired our last two administrative assistants now,
that being bilingual in Spanish was requirement so that we
can always translate things in Spanish because sometimes these
situations don’t always happen at a convenient time, right, it
might be right at the end of the day. And so, having that resource
right in my department to translate is very important. However we do not have a
Hmong or Somali translator in my department. We have district translators. But they’re not also
always in the building. They may be
assigned out to school. And so, not
necessarily readily available. And so, when we look at the
current notification system we have, we have a very robust
and one of the best parent notification
systems that’s out there. It actually came into the
district prior to my arrival. It actually was with Al Binkey
when he was the safety office. So it was not a necessarily
in the housed communication department. After Al left, we moved it to
my apartment as far as budgeting and managing the
contract and things like that. And so, despite that it was
important because I think a lot of questions always come up
about this to really lay out just what are the factors around
it as far as being able to actually get messages out? If so, when we send out an email
or a text message because this is a short number, all families
get that at the exact same time. So when we get the report you
can see all the email addresses, all the cell phone numbers, and
it will be time stamped all at the same time. The problem that we have, and
I don’t think any system can resolve that issue because it
just takes time to make phone calls, is the
automated phone calls. And so, once you put that into
the system is going to take a certain amount of time to
process those phone calls depending on how many
phone calls it’s making. And so, if it’s an
emergency situation, it’s not only then calling the
phone number identified with the student, it’s also calling
their emergency contacts, which is what that
set up to do, right? So that’s why we as parents
give that it information. Here you are the other
people that we want contacted if there’s an emergency. The way the system was set up
when I started here was that the phone, the system will call that
number four times before it will leave a message. We reduce that down to three to
try to help with the–getting the calls out. We can always modify that again,
but that was the way that it was set up when I came here. So, one of the biggest concerns
I think that we run into is especially when we look at
our outside secure the building situations. They are a tricky situation for
us to handle because sometimes they last a half hour,
sometimes the last five minutes. And the issue becomes that we
try to get that information, so what usually happens for us
is unlike our inclement weather notices which all
of you get as well, we can have all that
preprogrammed because everybody gets the same message,
everybody’s told there’s no school today or tomorrow, and
so we can pre-translate that, pre-recorded on phone messages,
it’s all set to go with push of a button. But I can’t do that because
I don’t know what building tomorrow’s going to
have secure the building, I don’t know if it will
be multiple buildings. And so, while we have all
of our scripts written, we have them all
translated for email, for text messages, I still need
a human to record that message on the phone. And so, that means we need
to track down the translator, we need to get them up to
speed what’s happening, and that can take the same
amount of time of the secure the building situation took, and so,
so that’s one of the things that we run into is sometimes for
us it just ends up we’d end up sending a message saying that
we were in secure the building because there just was no way to
physically get that message out prior. So, we can do things such as
send it out in all the other ways other than a phone call. I think the issue that we
have to recognize is that not everybody gets it then because
not everybody has an email. Now I would say that in some
ways were not reaching everybody any way because I know that I
hear from buildings where they often don’t have the most
up-to-date contact information for families. And so, they will run to the
whole chain of numbers and can’t reach anybody. So we know not all of our
students also have the most current phone numbers. But I do feel though that by the
phone calls and the situations we are reaching people. We did a very big campaign at
the beginning of the school year to try get parents to
sign up for texting. Because of FCC regulations we
can’t just make everybody get a text message. They have to opt in. So, we did a billboard
campaign, we did websites, we did school newsletters. So we really tried to get the
message out there that we really want to parents updated. We went down with it a little. We’ll come with that again a
little while again to try to again remind parents
and as you may have seen, I believe it is communicated
with you that November 14 is the first time we’ve
ever tried this, which is we’re going to do a
test of the system because we want parents to know is that
they don’t have those up-to-date contact information,
that’s I going to find out. So if by November 14 you
not get in to text from us, an email from us,
our a phone call, we don’t have your
correct contact information. And so, if you want to find out
when school’s canceled because of bad weather? It will be good idea to get in
touch with the school secretary or our help desk and get
that information updated. So we felt that this year we
would give that a try and see how that goes as a way to ensure
that people are getting those messages because
they are important. KATIE: Rhonda. RHONDA: We had talked about
the actual message itself. Are we always going to state
it’s an outside situation? LORI: When it’s an outside
situation we either say it’s a community situation or
an outside situation, yes. RHONDA: Are we
always going to do that? LORI: We’ve communicated on our
website and we’ve also provided blurbs for principles to put in
their newsletters so the parents understand what
that situation means, right? ‘Cause we monitor
Facebook page, we post those things on our
Facebook page and we see the comments that
parents make and you know, sometimes you can get a
sense that parents aren’t really concerned, right? So we always make sure to
respond to those as well as try to be proactive with the
newsletter articles saying that when there’s an
outside situation, the majority of the time
school happens as they normally would, right? We’ve had some situations where
perhaps is a situation outside and so we’ve been asked to
maybe move kids out of the room because of the windows there
on that side of the building, so those kids will
still be having class, but they may not be
having them in the classroom. But school will
continue as normal. And then we have messages
created for situations where it might be inside
the building, right, so an example of that, that
happened since I’ve been here, is we had a staff member who
needed to be removed by medical professionals. And so, they at that time
they locked everybody in the classrooms and they were not
able to exit during what would been passing time until, those
emergency professionals could get in, remove that
staff person safely, without having the
hallways all clogged up. RHONDA: Okay, but if that
message went out to families, you wouldn’t just say it was an
inside the building situation. There would be an additional
information so that people don’t actually think there was
an active shooter in the building, right? LORI: So, that depends. RHONDA: ‘Cause if I
got that message, I would die. LORI: So we change our practice
somewhat and I think that’s what we’re looking for clarification
for tonight because we used to, for the majority of situations,
something would go out usually at the end of the day
explaining what happened. And then many board members,
just like we did in my office, heard from parents on Facebook. You know, people want to
know as soon as it’s happening. But then in that situation,
I don’t have all the details either, right? So I might hear, I
get the text message, we need to put the
school secure the building. I don’t know why it’s
in secure the building, right? We’re just you know, not
until we gather and we meet, and we all talk and get
information from the police and find out what’s going on. I don’t have all the details and
that wouldn’t necessarily be my information to share. So that’s kind of the quandary
that I feel like our department is in is that we have
tried to be very proactive and communicate faster. I think that people do feel
concerned about what’s happening because before they used to get
information that kind of shared once we know all the facts,
could provide all the facts, here’s what happened today. RHONDA: So they don’t, so who
actually–you ultimately gives you that message that you have
to go and secure the building in the first place? VICKI: Chris, you want to talk
about that? CHRIS: So how it works is
secure the building for an outside situation means that
there’s something going on in the community, is not directly
affecting your school but we’re making you aware of it so
you can restrict movement. What happens is if law
enforcement has something going on, should I’m notified
that there conducting a search warrant in the hundred block of
the street commas close to these buildings, could you put
those buildings in a secure the building situation until we’re
done with our search warrant I make the building
clear, or safe? So then I will be
told what was occurring, then notify those buildings
of what’s happening, that the police department was
conducting a search warrant in this area, they want you to
secure the building for an outside situation. And then when they’re done with
their activities they’ll let us know when it’s all clear. RHONDA: So, you know to do this
because you were told there’s a search warrant. I guess that’s my question. And the messages that I have
gotten have been because of that. So you knowing there’s an
outside situation and that’s you’re told to tell the building
leadership or the district to do that. So, that message looks like
it would be pretty easy to say there’s an outside situation. So that, then, would be easy
to give t parents right off the bat, right? Because I think
what’s happened is, you know, so and so
comes up to the school. They have to pick up their
child because there’s a dentist appointment or something. All they have is a message that
they can’t get into the school and they don’t know why. They don’t know if it’s an
outside or inside situation. And so, it sounds like when you
get notification from the police you–they tell you why they
want you to secure the building, because that’s why
they’re calling you. LORI: Our messages have
always said there’s an outside situation. When we send it, if
that’s the situation, the message does say it’s for
either a community or outside situation. KATIE: You’re saying you
can’t be specific about inside situations always. LORI: Correct. VICKI: This is where we are
looking for some guidance. I’m sorry. MICHELLE: I was gonna say or
even outside situations because they change. LORI: Right, so sometimes
what comes in is with the police originally stating is an issue
doesn’t always end up being that a half hour later. So, that’s why I never feel
like it’s my place to share what police are dealing with because
I don’t have all the facts and often times the person who’s
letting Chris know may not have a piece of it but doesn’t
know all of it or the situation hasn’t completely developed. ED: What’s the principal’s role
in disseminating the information using school messenger? LORI: So, today is
a perfect example. We had a situation at Webster, I
believe you received the email that one out in the letter
that went out to families. So what happened with that was
I was contacted and asked if I would help craft something,
but then the principal was responsible for sending it out. So she initiated it, because I
obviously didn’t know that was an issue, initiated it
and then sent it out. ED: Are there any limitations on
principal’s authority to use the school messenger system? LORI: No. Other than they can only
send it to their school. ED: Understood that, okay. Well let me to a
story here, okay, this is 2000, I don’t
know, a number of years ago. I was principal at East high
school and we got a message to the police had wanted us to, we
used the term lock down at the time, lock down on all the
schools in the east quadrant area. Didn’t know why. And as soon as we put
out that announcement, I think it was a
level II lock down, or level III lockdown
that we used at that time. As soon as I got on the PA
system I said we’ve gotta lock down, we’re gonna
continue on as normal, but nobody leaves the building. The phone started ringing off
the hook because every kid was texting the message
home, understandably. As soon as I got the information
about what was going on, I let the staff another email,
I got on the PA system and said check your email
right now staff, they did–and in the email I
said I’m going to make this announcement in 30 seconds. It announced what was going
on and then told the kids, take your phones out of your
pockets and your purses and text the message home. The message got out, you know,
immediately I followed it up with school
messenger right away. I think people just need to be
empowered to get the messages out, get as much
information out as you can. Obviously you’re not going to
do something to compromise the situation. I’m not going to, as a principal
I would not say the police are serving a search
warrant on Cherry Street. That would be irresponsible. But you know, to get the
information out that the police are conducting an activity, they
asked us to keep people inside, bingo. LORI: And that’s what our
message says is that parents should continue just check
social media in our website because as we do get reliable,
verified information in, I mean we do keep updating it. I mean a perfect example, that
affected us directly was the mercury situation at Lincoln. The message went out to families
and as we had updates all day long, rather than continue to
bottom for families all day long families with phone calls, we
kept updating that information, we kept sharing
it with the media, and then when we had to then let
them know what the reunification process would be, that’s
when we did another phone call. CHRIS: Another example would
be earlier this year we had a situation near
Washington East and Minoka, lasted about five minutes and
25 minutes later we have another situation at the same residence,
that lasted another five minutes. So, when the first
message was put out, instead of putting out
a whole other message, it was an update to
that message saying, again, went into another
situation like this for basically the same thing. In a lot of the cases
they’re happening so quickly, by the time were
getting information out, it’s already over with. LORI: And I would say that all
of those conversations are held with the principal. I mean so when we, so when we
have a situation that’s to the degree were we call
incident command and we all come together, the principal’s
on the phone with us. And so, the principal
isn’t excluded from those conversations at all. ED: I’m not saying
that they’re excluded. I want to make sure the
principals understand they have the authority to get on
the school messenger, whatever means they have. And they get information out
that they don’t have to wait for permission to get that out, or
they don’t have to wait for you to point it out. LORI: I think what we’ve found
is that they appreciate that we take care of that from our
office because we’re the ones running down the translators
to get things translated. And they’re able to do with
the situations in the buildings while we’re taking
care of those things. CHRIS: And the conversations
I’ve had with principals as part of my site assessments when
we discussed that part of it, is they all know and
use school messenger, but understand that in those
types of situations they have expressed the gratitude
that they can put out a quick message, but they can’t put it
out in five different languages as needed. So if there’s something then
quick that need to get out, they will explain they
will do it and have done it, but on things like that they
appreciate that someone else is able to handle those things. So I think they understand
they’re empowered to do that, if that’s what they’re asking. KATIE: Andrew. ANDREW: I just wanted to say
that for sure however we word it, and I don’t have the
answer, but that the situation, if there was a situation,
which, if there was any kind of situation that was reported
out as inside the building, regardless of
what it said after, the words inside
the building secured, that would cause
panic, whether was, you know because of, I don’t
know because of the water leak we have to pick up 10 minutes
late and use the back door. As soon as that notice says
inside the building issue, people are going
to think the worst. So I don’t know what the answer
is for it and it sounds like it’s the, I mean the one example
those mentioned just related to a change of passing times. So it maybe wouldn’t have
had to be texted out at all, but that was just my only… LORI: In that case
message when a after the incident occurred, so… ANDREW: Yeah. CHRIS: It’s unfortunate that in
today’s world when things come out about something
happening in the school, everyone thinks the worst,
and everyone’s heart stops and everyone fears that there’s
something terrible going on at the school and people feel that
they need to leave what they’re doing and run to their kid’s
school and it could end up being nothing, but so many things are
happening that everyone’s first thought is
something bad is happening. ANDREW: I’m talking about was
reported through the system that we normally report security,
or secure the building rule. CHRIS: Right. MICHELLE: We have that. Just wanted to share, I think
that the language getting things out in multiple languages
is much more challenging, I think sometimes
than people recognize. We had the situation where we
were trying to put the letter out to the community recently
and one of our translators we thought was translating,
and that person was out ill. So it’s really all those pieces. I think that we’re fortunate
was Lillian in the office, because she can do
some quick stuff for us, she isn’t an official
translator for the department, for the district, but
she does some real quick, good work for us. But really being able to put
out in multiple languages. And that’s the piece that
I want clarification on. I think that it gets really,
I’ve stood there many times and thought do we just put it out in
English first and then figure, and then put the next
part out, or is that being, you know what I mean? Because sometimes we wait, and
we wait a while. ED: We shouldn’t be waiting. KRISTINA: What did you say, Ed? ED: I said, we
shouldn’t be waiting. Put it out in English first and
get it on there and then then say translation will follow. KRISTINA: Do we do videos? ED: If I don’t speak
English at least I got the, you know, it says that
translation will follow. KRISTINA: Do we do videos? Like short videos clips
of like if people can’t, if reading is not
easy for them, like, have we ever thought about that? LORI: So for a while my
department didn’t do it, but for a while the ELL
department had been doing messages in audio messages for
Somali families who may not read either English or Somali. But I don’t think
they’ve continued that. MICHELLE: But
that’s a lot faster. ED: Could we send a video clip. KRISTINA: Well and I’m just
thinking what we’re doing with the ICE situation. We were thinking like have
John get on Facebook and, like, do a, I’m sorry
John, I picked you. It’s like, have you been on, and
do a 45 second this is what’s happening. I don’t know. Just–I think my
concern is there so much, like, you’re saying,
it moves so quickly. And I remember Rhonda and I were
looking when I don’t expect and there is a message about
something that it happened that ICE was in our
school and it was, like, obviously not true, but it
had been shared like 800 times with some of our students. And I am, you know, blowing a
gasket because I’m thinking on my gosh all these
students think this is true. How do we mitigate that? RHONDA: And parents thought it. KRISTINA: And
parents thought it, too. KATIE: Jamie? JAMIE: So, referring to the
lockdown situations conversation from the student perspective, so
last year there was a situation at West where we hadn’t locked
down but it wasn’t clear to us whether or not it was
inside or outside situation. We were, I know I
was in biology. We will put the back lab. We had a substitute teacher, the
other biology teacher came in, unlocked the door, told us
we all had to get in now. And we had to students
crying, texting their parents, no one knew what was going
on, and it was a really scary situation for the
kids that were there. So, I don’t know if there is any
way that can be better clarified to students to reduce the stress
on them when it’s an outside situation. LORI: Sorry, they should react. ANDREW: Was that even a level
of–was that even an event that called for people to be
relocated within the building or just to not exit the building? JAMIE: Not in my classroom,
but because–I know it was a shooting going on
near the school. And so, there were some
classes that needed to be moved, but in my classroom it was just
a matter of the teachers didn’t know what was happening. The teachers didn’t know
what was inside or outside. So, they were doing. KATIE: So they
prepared for the worst. JAMIE: Yeah. CHRIS: Are you referring to when
they had it was I was like a drug by shooting that occurred
right across the street? JAMIE: Yeah. ANDREW: So is that a true,
were there is some classrooms directed to relocate
kids and some weren’t? CHRIS: I don’t know
what the schools had. I wasn’t in control of
the messages at that point. So, I don’t know
what they were doing. I don’t know what the staff told
them or the administrators told her staff. KATIE: But that,
to your point, Ed, that is something the principal
could’ve been communicating with people. know that for that. ED: You get out as much
information as you can without compromising the situation. In that situation they should
have told you exactly what was going on. JAMIE: For that situation I know
a teacher was the first person to see it before the, like,
the school called the police. Because it was right
outside of teacher’s window. So, I don’t know if that’s why
the situation wasn’t properly take care of. But still I feel like there was
a lot of fear and the situation was handled a little messily. VICKI: Mr. Dorff is right,
we should be doing in every situation like that is get on
the PA and tell everything that we know. LORI: Yeah. VICKI: In the old days
it used to be codes, not anymore. Not anymore. MICHELLE: True. VICKI: I’m sorry that happened. We are looking for
guidance, so thank you for Dr. Langenfeld asking. As the board missed wishes to
move quickly and get a message out in English first. And then when we were able
to follow up later with the translator. LORI: I’m sorry, I don’t know if
our system allows us to do that. Because how it works is
that it automatically. I mean, so then if we were to do
that them probably the best way for us to do it is to just have
it automatically translate and it sends what it sends. And we got messages back from
our–like Louise Franco who is our community family engagement
coordinator saying for us to have a truly translated because
it’s like when we read something that’s a little in language and
we asked Facebook to translate it, it’s not perfect
English, and you know, it’s not perfect in
their language either. But then because we don’t get to
just say just send it in English or send it in Spanish, the way
to get the system works is it automatically determines, based
on putting in Infinite Campus who gets what language. So I can’t determine
English, Spanish, Somali. I can only send a message
come I can have it automatically translated, Hmong
would not get it then, and we could send
it out that way, but that is a
limitation in the system. ANDREW: Okay, I’m
not–it’s not your fault, is the system’s fall. We spent a lot of
money on these systems, and if the system can’t
do what you need it to do, what we need it to do, then I
like the system to get revisited and I’m guessing for
whatever companies these are, we are probably pretty darn
big account them that they don’t want to mess things up with,
so that maybe they can work a little bit harder on it. And that’s they being
the outside companies, the software vendors, not you. I want the PR, I want all of our
departments to have the tools to communicate with
families that they need, and I think, you know, little
pressure from a big account that you’re not quite getting the job
done and bidding times coming up soon, maybe that would get
some–we might be in the nice situation of having a 25,000
size accounts to be able to nudge some things
along the way that, you know, 300 client account
might not be able to do that. So I’d like us to take
advantage of that when we can. LORI: I’m just going to add that
I think part of the reason for that is because the strength of
the program as it feeds into out Infinite–it talks are
Infinite Campus system. So that daily is
updating so every night, it rolls up information. So, if I’m parent and I
change my phone number today, by tomorrow my correct phone
number will be the one that the system uses. So, I appreciate what you say
and we’ve had success since I was here. We were not able to send
things in Somali or Hmong. We’ve also put a lot of pressure
on them to allow us to text in other languages. We’ve had not had
that opportunity before. We can now text in Somali, as
well as we can do translate to Somali in an
emergency if we need to. I think the question is in those
situations questions is that what you would prefer us to do? I mean, we have been trying to
do the proper translation and knowing we weren’t going to have
the Hmong option if we go that way. But if that’s the preferences we
would prefer to do it faster and just hit the
automatic translate. I mean, that’s
something that we can do. ANDREW: Does it have
to be one of the other, or can we follow-up? LORI: We can always follow-up. It’s whatever the
initial call is, right? ED: Well, put a tagline on it. LORI: I can’t do a
phone call of it though. ED: Say they will be a
follow-up and test it. And you know, does that come
across appropriately in Spanish, does it come account cross
appropriately in Somali? LORI: We can’t do an
automated phone call that way. And if we have to have a
translator for automated phone call. It will translate Somali and in
Spanish text messages and email. But there’s no way to
do voice translation. ED: Okay, well, then test
it with a text message. Just, you know, see
what comes across. If it needs to be
modified, test it out. But I think you need to get that
information out there as quick as possible and, you know, as
I said before let them know in whatever means is necessary that
more information will be coming. LORI: Yeah. Just like I said come I can’t
send it in English first and then send it in
another language. The English would
just get it again. ED: I get that. LORI: Okay. KATIE: Brenda. BRENDA: Well, I think if we
do that it’s important to have conversation, or some
sort of communication, with the families that are now
getting not perfect translations of the messages to
just explain, you know, why we’re doing what we’re doing
and it’s weighing the speed versus accuracy factor. Because I mean, then I’m
comfortable just sending it out in English and letting
the machine translate, just if it’s message that
needs to get out quickly, yeah. MICHELLE: Right. LORI: And so, then we would not
be reaching families who don’t have email. Because again, I need the
translator to do the voice. BRENDA: How many
families do we miss? LORI: So we miss about 1,500. BRENDA: How many families do we
miss because we have the wrong phone numbers? LORI: Yeah, that was the
point I was trying to raise. I just want to… BRENDA: We’re missing people no
matter what communication device we use, I think. But at some point–you also
mentioned before that you update it on Facebook and– MICHELLE: On the website. BRENDA: The website, yeah. LORI: On the website which is
the same company that we have our website with, and a big
piece of that was because of–it had the notification, the red
alert notification message that could be put on every homepage. So again, we put it on the
district page and then any school that’s affected. There also looking to move with
that same company to an app that which would hope to have
in by the end of the year. With the app would allow is
for us to do push notifications using that same notification
system that we have now. So you can push up a
phone call, email, text message, as well as a push
notification to anybody who has the app. And what that allows then is
for–and I believe I have to double check, but I believe you
choose what language you want the app in, and so they need the
messages of the languages that we’ve chosen. So again it’s like
a Google translate, it’s not perfect translation. And then you as the individual
can set up where you want notifications from. So, you may say I only
want district notifications, you may say, I want
one from every school, which I would recommend. Because you know, I hope that
principles would be using that for don’t forget
tomorrow’s PTO meeting, don’t forget
tomorrow’s picture day. Right, so people may not
want everybody’s message. But that’s–the purpose behind
that is to help us with some of your community partners who have
expressed concerns that they don’t necessarily get notified
when there’s a secure the building situation. So mostly it
affects, like, day cares, that maybe pick up kids after
school that take them to their day care. And so then they may not know
that there is a delay in school being released. And so, they would then
also have that information. Or assist for families for maybe
a child goes to more than one school. And so then, you may, if your
child is taking because at one school you may not get the
message that school being a secure the building because
you’re not in that calendar, right? And so, then they could signed
up for push notifications for that school as well. So, but that’s gonna take us a
little bit of time to get that organized and rolled out, so… BRENDA: So, do you have
what you need from us, or is it still kind of muddy? VICKI: Well, I
think that part’s good. We’ll get the message out as
quick as we can and translate as quick as we can. BRENDA: And everybody’s
comfortable with that? VICKI: And I’ll move
forward with the last page, setting up committee. To start taking a look at the
program and also asking Dr. Stramp, with Dr.
Langenfeld’s permission to move forward with the
program evaluation. Thank you for your time. BRENDA: Thank you. KATIE: Thank you. All right, school
safety policies and rules. MELISSA: Last item on the
teaching and learning agenda tonight is a series of 700
policies regarding school safety. These policies, in large part,
are due to the new legislation that came out this year
regarding school safety, as well as to codify what
we’re already doing here in the district. So, we have the
policies in front of you. Do you want me to
just to go, Katie, one by one? KATIE: One by one, so if anybody
has any questions or comments. MELISSA: Okay, just so everyone
knows that these policies, Chris had taken these policies
to a school safety committee, they were reviewed
by the committee, the committee provided input. We internally, also
here in the district, and with principles and staff
also reviewed and provided input in these policies. So, we are recommending–the
first recommendation is that we have the policy and
rule 455 be repealed. The language from policy 455 has
been included in policy 720 and 723, and rule 455 has just
been renumbered to be rule 720. So that will be on your agenda
for the board member to repeal that policy in the rule. Policy 720 is the health
and safety district facility disabilities and program. And Kristina, this reflects
the language of the district’s priorities with respect to
safety in our school buildings and for a staff in our
school and our community. The policy describes the
district’s overall safety program, including the roles and
responsibilities of the safety coordinator and those
statutorily required school safety teams that we
had heard about before. KRISTINA: Can I
just ask a quick question? MELISSA: Sure. KATIE: Kristina? KRISTINA: Under E-2,
instructional staff requirements MELISSA: I’m
sorry, say that again. KRISTINA: E-2. MELISSA: E. BRENDA: Are you in
the rule or the policy? KRISTINA: Sorry,
I’m in the rule, 720, sorry. And was this here before
and again I apologize, I’m new here, so I’m
learning, where it says, teachers are expected
teach with the doors locked, was that there prior too? MELISSA: This policy, this rule
is the exact replica for 455. KRISTINA: I didn’t
know if that was standard. MELISSA: That’s correct. KRISTINA: And when
it’s is expected to, that means all
times, like, everybody, all the time. CHRIS: During
times of instruction. KRISTINA: During
times of instruction, thank you. MELISSA: Any other questions
on policy and rule 720? Okay, moving on to policy 722
is reporting injuries and unsafe conditions, this policy
addresses the process for reporting injuries and unsafe
conditions and workplace safety concerns for students,
staff, and visitors. Again, just codifying what
large extended practices, Jennifer Vincent in human
resources who deals a lot with our reporting of injuries and a
worker’s comp and other matters also provided very valuable
insight into this policy. KATIE: Any
questions or concerns? Hearing none we’ll
move that forward. MELISSA: Okay. Policy 723 school safety plans. This is part of the legislation
even before the recent updated legislation we were required
to have school safety plans. And thee school safety plans
must address various statutory requirements. The policy addresses the
statutory requirements and sets the procedures for the
implementation of that school safety plan review,
update, adoption, and dissemination. It also sets forth the training
requirements for school safety plans as required
by the state law. KATIE: Questions? Brenda. BRENDA: So that
giant list of 71 things. MELISSA: Yes. BRENDA: That says we
have to have plans for, where are those plans, the
guidelines and procedures for all those things? Where are they
physically located? MELISSA: In the red binder,
our red school safety binder. BRENDA: And each
school has those? VICKI: Multiple copies. BRENDA: Multiple, okay. CHRIS: And
they’re in Class Link. BRENDA: And they’re what? CHRIS: And
they’re in Class Link. BRENDA: Okay, right. Thanks. KATIE: Any other
questions or comments? RHONDA: I have one. KATIE: Rhonda? RHONDA: What is the
parent-student reunification? CHRIS: Parent-student
reunification is if you have an incident when students are
evacuating the building, you need to reunify the students
with your parents so they decided then organizing
getting back together. KRISTINA: I have
another question, Chris, for
newly-hired employees, when they receive that
orientation about the safety, school safety plan,
who’s doing that for them, with then? The principal? CHRIS: I believe they get a
piece of that during the new employee orientation, but when
they get to their buildings they are explained the processes of
how to do their drills and how the Alice procedures work. KRISTINA: By the principal? CHRIS: Yeah, in most cases by
the principal or whoever the safety point person
is in their building. KRISTINA: Okay, thank you. KATIE: Any other
questions, comments? Move that one forward. MELISSA: Policy 723.1, emergency
drills involving students. This policy addresses the state
law that requires public school districts to conduct various
emergency drills involving our students. The policy provides further
information regarding these drills as well as the procedures
for conducting those drills. And I believe it was your last
meeting where we brought forward the reports of those school
safety drills that is now required to go to the
school board for your review and approval as well. And that’s what’s
addressed here in this policy. KATIE: Questions or comments? Hearing none, we’ll
move that forward. MELISSA: Policy 7
and rule 723.2, threats of school violence. The recently adopted school
safety legislation created a new requirement that all school
violence threats be reported by law enforcement immediately. In addition, schools are
required to accept such threats and the proposed policy
that sets forth the district’s process for implementing
these statutory obligations. The rule provides the
procedures for addressing threat identification,
assessment, and response, including the purpose and the
goals of threat identification and assessment. KATIE: Questions or comments? Hearing none we’ll
move that forward. MELISSA: Okay, and the last
policy is just in time for winter weather, 723.3,
emergency school closings. From time to time unfortunately
we have to close our buildings due to various emergencies such
as weather or other health and safety concerns. And this policy addresses the
procedure for closing schools as well as the procedures for
make up time as a result of those closures. KATIE: Any questions or
comments on this one? Hearing none we’ll
move that forward. MELISSA: Thank you. KATIE: And that concludes the
teaching and learning portion of the work session. BRENDA: Thanks, Katie. Next we have operational support
and that will be facilitated by Andrew Becker. ANDREW: Okay, under human
resources we have–under discussion plans
we have no items, business, finance,
or human resources. Discussion and public comment,
we have no items under business and finances. And we have
employee benefits, health, and wellness. I’m hoping we’ll be able to go
quite a bit under 45 minutes on here and focus on–it’s
important but no immediate action is being
requested right now. JEAN: It’s
correct, that’s correct. I will try to get to this
because I know that you received a pretty lengthy
memo that I sent out, which gives you a lot of the
detail that this PowerPoint will not. Joining me at the
table is Jennifer Vincent, the manager of employee services
and she and I will be tag teaming on
presenting this to you. Feel free to ask questions and
if there’s something that I can answer, I’ll
certainly get it to you. We have a very
comprehensive benefit program. And this is the first time I
think we’ve pulled it altogether so that in one document you
could see what we do offer employees. And to me comprehensive
means that at different times in people’s lives they’re going
to need different levels of benefits. And so, as a large
employer, we want to have a very comprehensive and attractive
benefits program that meets the needs of our employees. Depending upon where
they are in their lives. I think that our benefits
are very well received and our spring staff perception survey,
85% of our employees strongly agreed or agreed that they are
satisfied with their benefits, which is a very,
very high number. Jennifer is going to tell you a
little bit about the health and wellness center. JENNIFER: In November of 2018 we
opened the health and wellness center, it’s
actually located here. And it’s operated by Purveya,
it’s available for any of our employees or retirees who are
on the district medical plan to utilize. You can you see some of the
information that we have there. It’s basically another
option for them to get quick, efficient, and affordable care. And it’s pretty well
utilized within the district. So, the numbers that we have
listed on here indicate the number of visits from
a medical standpoint. We also utilize it in human
resources for preemployment as well. So, moving on to
personal health assessments. In 2014 we began offering
consistently personal health assessments in collaboration
with our health plan. We now have five years of data,
and we have a cohort group of 2,289 employees and spouses who
have participated all five years. It’s a pretty good
story to tell with it. Within this cohort group we have
a score that has–people have aged 5 years, but their overall
score has remained very stable, which is a very positive thing. The score right now is 79.8,
that’s on 100 point scale. But knowing that it started
it 80.5 and 2014 it’s pretty positive thing that the
help the state that well. We also have–the
reports are confidential, we don’t get anybody’s results. But we have Bellin do outreach
to two people who are tobacco users and people
assert health conditions. So, each year a number of
letters go out to those individuals offering them some
additional information as far as what’s available to help
them through that process. We typically have a three-month
window in which people can have that personal
health assessments done. And in this past year we had
over 90% of the people who participate in the medical
plan take the health assessment. So again, a positive story. Also, there’s questions in
addition to the biometrics and the measurements that are
done, there are self-reporting questions and we found that
89.3% of our employees have a primary care provider, which is
very–it’s a very high number, it’s a great number. And 75.4 have had
an annual physical. So, we know that people are
engaging in their healthcare. Just a little bit
about our medical plan. The medical plan is
a self-funded plan, which means that we have a
company we currently utilize, UMR, they pay the claims for
us, but it’s a district plan. And when they pay the claims,
it’s district money that is being utilized to
pay the claims. So, they’re basically hired by
us to do the administration side of things. So, you can see on the slide
we have the total spent for our–the medical claims in the
administration and the pharmacy in the past year
was $42.6 million. JEAN: Other than salaries this
is the highest cost item that the district has in the budget. JENNIFER: Dental plan, again
we’re self-funded with dental and that’s
administered by Delta Dental. Two unique aspects
of our dental plan. We have a smarter dental plan
which allows for additional cleanings or people have
certain medical conditions. We know that there is a
correlation between oral health and overall health of people. So, the smarter dental plans, if
people have certain conditions I can get additional claims that
are covered as provisional care, there’s no cost to the employee. So, diabetes,
pregnancy, certain cancers, things like that. We also Check Up Plus which
Check Up Plus program basically allows people to get the
preventative cleanings and not have the cost of that go
toward their annual maximum that they’re allowed for
expenses on the dental plan. So, it’s a nice way to allow
people to get those things and not have account gives them
until they get anything else. Life insurance is
administrated by MetLife. Basic life is offered to all
employees who work at least five and half hours per week. It’s provided by the
district, no cost to employees. If they choose they can purchase
additional life insurance, a voluntary life
insurance for themselves, they purchase it for themselves
they can also purchase it for any family
members, any dependents. With that–with MetLife also
offers will preparation services for people, and they also have
also travel insurance which is available, so some
additional options for people. We have an income
protection program that is again district-provided. This is basically
district-provided short-term disability plan that
all regular employees, again, working 5 1/2 hours
per week are eligible for. And basically it’s the
wage continuation should they medically be able unable to
work for a period of time. The short-term
disability, the IPP, can go for up to one year or
until long-term disability is approved, if long-term
disability is applicable for the person. Our long-term disability is
administered by The Standard. We have a 90 day
elimination period. So after the 90 days the
long term would kick in, again, if eligible and if
the long-term disability is appropriate for the person. The aspect with long-term
disability that I want to talk about is we have a work place
possibilities program that The Standard offers. And what this is is a program
that allows–basically we can get assistance from the standard
to help people stay at work. They’re really helping us keep
people who have conditions that might otherwise put them
off work stay at work. And they’ll come in
and do an evaluation, they get the approval from
the employee to work with their doctors to find out
what conditions they have, what might be the
best solutions for them. And they will actually
purchase the equipment, or whatever it is,
bring it into the district. It then becomes district
property for more for us to use in the future
should we have a need. It’s been a very
successful plan for us. In the past we have a number
of people who have utilized it. We’ve been able to keep people
at work through that program, and it’s been
utilized from educators, administrators,
across the board. JEAN: Our employee
assistance program, we’ve been with the Employee
Resource Center for well over 15 years, and the part that I
want to point out is that is integrated with a medical plan,
our actual contract with ERC says that if the employee goes
to an Employee Resource Center first and then is referred
out to another provider, their copay deductibles and
coinsurance deductibles are waved. So it gives people an incentive
to go in early to get help that they need. We added athletic trainer
appointments this last month and partnering with Bellin at the
schools you see listed here, or any of our employees, medical
insurance is not required, can make an appointment with a
Bellin Athletic Trainer for some of their musculoskeletal issues
and musculoskeletal is probably our highest cost
issue that we deal with. So, this will help people
get–seek trainer treatment earlier. What the trainers will do is
they’ll certainly refer out if necessary, but then they provide
some exercise for the individual and guidance as to what
they think is the issue. And we’ve had people already
start to tell us that they’ve used this. And then we added retail
clinics about two years ago. And this offers extended
hours to our employees. Hours that our clinic is an
open and the clinics that are typically closed and
there’s a typical $10 co-pay. We haven’t had this used
as much this past year. I’m not sure why, but up
we’re going to start with this a little heavier because it is a
great way to get care quickly when you need it. And then, Jennifer talked
about worker compensation. JENNIFER: Sure, we partner
with Purveya Employer Services? So, anytime we get an accident
report from an employee. They reach out to that
employee on our behalf, help us with the process, talk
the person through should they have any questions about whether
or not they need any care. Sometimes people don’t realize
the need any care when they do. So, we have a registered nurse
who has a background and can assist people with
making that determination. Also, helps me as far as getting
some of the documentation as far as whether somebody
has work restrictions, whether they’re able
to come back to work. So we can keep
the process moving, make sure we get subs in place
and have people in front of the kids at all times. Our worker’s comp, which is used
to calculate our premium rate is trending down. So, we’re making
some good strides. JEAN: And lastly, one of
the last things we offer is a retiree insurance education. When a person is
looking at retirement, healthcare is one of the major
things that they’re thinking about. And it’s very complicated
what type of something that they should get, should they
stay in the district plan, how do you
register for Medicare? So, we’ve been
offering several sessions, once, sometimes twice a year. Our next session is actually
this Wednesday and we have somebody from M3 who is a
specialist in this to provide insurance
information for our retirees, or people
thinking about retiring. Finally next week we hope to
bring you some recommendations. Some of the things
we’re looking at, really, the focus really is on
making sure that the employees have different access points
that they can get the care that they need as soon as possible
because that helps keep costs down. So, we’re looking to expand
access points by the partnering with Bellin. Bellin is willing to open
our–their near-site clinics and offer hours for employees,
get in first day if they can. And the fee will be $70 per
hour and they’ll charge us in 15 minute increments. The other thing we would look
at is Bellin would’ve been there physical therapy
to our employees. I think the cost is $92 an hour
and employees will be given and phone number specifically
for our employees to call, the Bellin receptionist will
know it’s our employees and they will make sure they get
in as soon as possible. We’re looking at a
root weight loss program, too, that would be people
eligible to do this would have to meet certain criteria. Telemedicine is something that’s
relatively new in the Green Bay area, but not so new in some
of the larger cities where an adduce can call up, speak
to a doctor on the phone, and if appropriate, would be
diagnosed and medication or treatment would be offered
or referral if necessary. And then finally we are
considering bringing to the board the elimination of
the fees for our own clinic. The employees of her and their
families currently are us to pay $5. We’d like to eliminate
any barriers to that. And so, we like to
next time you been, on the 19th, propose
that we eliminate the fees. So these would most likely be
in the form of a motion because they will have some
financial impact, which we’ll explain. KRISTINA: Can I say something? JEAN: The last thing is we’d
like to brand our benefits, health and illness, and that way
we’d be local where we offer the any of these products or any
of these services or things to these employees, it would
be instantly recognizable. And that’s the way sometimes
companies will do that when they have such a
comprehensive program. And it is
certainly an attractor. That being said I should
also make the board aware that because we offer a
very robust plan, you can see how expensive it is
just by looking at the cost of health insurance. Should there be any
need to reduce costs, this will be
something that, you know, you would most likely look at. I do think that that there are
things that could be changed that wouldn’t necessarily
be problematic in terms of affecting recruitment. But we do have one of
the best plans around, as you can see,
very comprehensive. Meet the needs of employees. And anecdotally when we meet
with our employee groups they do tell us that. ANDREW: Questions? Kristina? KRISTINA: I appreciate you
waiting till the end to get this, Jean. I think that your workaround
this is really awesome and I would never want a
vote to take this away. I think that our teachers and
our staff are powerful role models for our students. They set the tone for health and
wellness throughout our district and our classroom. And you know, schools are
not only a place of learning, but they’re also worksites and
we need to make that connection, because when our
teachers are healthy, our kids are gonna be healthy,
and our community or will be healthy. So, thank you for
your work in this. I’ve also made the
recommendation to Jean, sort of just
having conversations, I know I talked about this all
the time and you’ll be tired of me talking about
the whole school, whole community,
whole child model. But my recommendation to Jean,
when we were talking sort of about her work was to
move–to integrate, not move but to integrate
employee wellness into the conversation of wellness
that we do around the district. I think if we can move into a
more collaborative partnership to show that it’s
all interconnected, you’ll not only get more buy-in,
but the impact of the programs will be stronger as well. JEAN: Yes. KRISTINA: I look
forward to this conversations, so thank you. ANDREW: Other questions? Okay, thank you. Then we have hiring of
administration and staff policies and rules. I have employment
of administration, policy 220. MELISSA: If you recall at–it’s
late and I can’t remember what month it was that it was
requested to bring forward the administrative hiring
policies in November, so here we are. We had, Jean and I had the
opportunity to meet with Ed and Brenda and Laura to review the
language of the policies we’re bringing forward tonight. And of course when we
peel open one policy, it implicates other policies,
so that’s why you see more than just the policies that
were asked to be reviewed. And that’s were
bringing forward tonight. So the first
policy is policy 220, employment of the
administration. This policy, it’s
connected to the recruitment, hiring, and
assignment of administration. So, really, this policy was just
place instead of four standard formats and align so that the
the policies that are going to be changed, that they were using
the same language and input in that standard format. ANDREW: Okay,
questions on this one? All right, I’ll move that
forward and then recruitment, hiring, training, assignment
of the administration, policy and
procedures for replacement, hiring, and transfer policy 221. MELISSA: Okay, this is
the policy and the rule, we’re going to see the
largest majority of the changes. The policy and rule were
placed in the standard format. The language was revised in the
policy that required the Board of Education to
approve recommendations for administrative hires to
providing discretion to the Board of Education to making
the decision to employ the recommended candidate. The policy and will establish
a policy for filling vacancies through internal transfers of
the hiring of and internal or external candidate. Notably as
requested in our meetings, the policy rule requires
stakeholder input for the filling of a vacancy either
with an internal transfer or the hiring of an internal-external
can do that for all lead department administrator
and site-based them and lead administrators. So were talking about
building principals, executive directors, chief
human resources officer, the chief financial officer,
assistant superintendents, any of those lead
department administrators. The rule clarifies the process
for filling a vacancy with an internal transfer, versus
the hiring of an internal or external candidate. Again, provides for stakeholder
input when filling the vacancies and specifies a robust community
input process for hiring of internal-external candidates for
those positions that I have just identified. And sets forth a detailed
process with the hiring of internal and
external candidates, and requires revisions of
approved job descriptions be brought to the board for
approval and sets forth the process for conditional
offers of employment. ANDREW: Okay, any
questions on that? Rhonda? RHONDA: So, we’re still
receiving a hire to approve or not approve. As a board. JEAN: You mean the recommended
motion would come before the board, yes. JEAN: Yes. MELISSA: You’re the only
body that can determine that. RHONDA: Okay. ANDREW: Other questions? And move that forward. And then we have
superintendent, administrator, managerial,
professional, technical, executive
assistant, staff contracts, policy 222. MELISSA: This policy was
placed in standard format. It clarifies a process from
employment of contracting with a non-renewal of administrators
consistent with the state law. It delegates the authority to
the superintendent schools of learning to execute the
contracts on behalf of the board. So this is delegating the
authority once you have approved the contracts to essentially use
the stamp to stamp contracts. Otherwise the Board President
would be required to hand sign every single contract that
comes–that is issued then after you have approved the contract. So, we need you to delegate that
authority for the superintendent or designee to
stamp the contracts. And then it clarifies the
licensing requirements for administrators and the
consequences if an administrator were not to be licensed. ANDREW: Okay, any
questions there? Does the–but the–so does this
mean the superintendent manages the superintendent’s own
contracts are that carved out separately in there? MELISSA: That’s carved out
separately in the policy, yes. ANDREW: All right. Any other questions? We’ll move that forward. And then staff recruitment and
hiring policy and procedures for staff recruitment hiring
rule policy 533 rule, 533R. MELISSA: This policy and
rule was placed in the standard format and these–this policy
and rule was revised to provide the Board of Education with the
discretion of whether to approve the contracts for
hiring of staff. The previous
language required approval, this language provides that
discretion to the Board of Education. And then this sets forward–the
rule sets forth the detailed hiring process for internal
and external candidates, requires provisions for job
descriptions be brought to the board for approval, and provides
further clarity for the process of hiring
professional employees, those employees who require
contracts under the statute 118.22. And sets forth the process
for conditional offers of employment. ANDREW: Okay, so
this is entirely new, but based on discussions? MELISSA: The rule is new, we
did not have a rule before, but it really just
codifies, Andrew, what the human resources
department was doing and what the statute provides with
respect to contracts for professional staff
or certified staff. ANDREW: Okay, so as
far as the, okay, I had the rule opened twice. And I see the strike
that we were looking for, so okay. Any questions on 533? All right. RHONDA: Sorry. Just–it probably
means just what it says, but just clarify
the superintendent, acting as the board is
authorized agent me execute an employee’s board approved
employment contract on behalf of the board. MELISSA: It’s the stamp. RHONDA: C. MELISSA: So once you
approve that contract, the superintendent can delegate
or instruct the human resources department to add Brenda’s
signature to the approved contracts. RHONDA: Okay. Okay, never mind. ANDREW: Okay, anything else? Okay, that
concludes the work session. BRENDA: All right, I
would entertain a motion for adjournment. KATIE: So moved. ED: Second. BRENDA: All in favor. ALL: Aye. BRENDA: Opposed? We are adjourned. (loud rustling) ♪♪ANNOUNCER: You have been
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