Compositing 101: The Art of Seamless Visual Effects | FilmoraPro Tutorial

Compositing 101: The Art of Seamless Visual Effects | FilmoraPro Tutorial


Welcome to FilmoraPro, a new way to power up your storytelling. In this video, we’ll be taking an introductory look at compositing in FilmoraPro. Compositing is the practice of inserting images or videos on top of other video And today we’ll be covering how to layer your footage, how to get a picture-in-picture effect, how to work with blend modes, light leaks, lens flares, and how to do basic screen replacement with warp and blur effects. FilmoraPro gives you an unlimited amount of video tracks to work with, making overlaying and compositing clips very versatile. A basic thing to know is that if we place a clip on a video track above another clip, the one on top will appear above it similar to how layers work in photo editing and graphics apps. We can also adjust the opacity of the clip on top if we want to see through it just like this, and we can continue to layer more and more clips on top if we want. The picture-in-picture effect is basically when you have a smaller video play on top of the larger video. A lot of gaming videos use this effect to record their live reactions. You can easily get this effect by placing the video you want to appear as the smaller one above your other footage. From there, you can drag the PiP effect onto your clip and adjust settings from there. For more flexibility you can also create one manually by selecting your top layer, going to the effects panel, and adjusting the scale and position. If you’re adjusting the scale in the viewer panel you can keep your footage proportional by holding shift while you adjust its size from there. If we want to further have this clip stand out one thing we can do is add a drop shadow effect. Another key concept to understand when it comes to compositing is how blend modes work. Blend modes can be set on your clips, images, and planes and determine how your image blends with the images below it. By default the blend mode of anything you’re working on is set to normal. But there are times when it’s useful to change the blend. For example, we’ve got this sketch of a black arrow on a white backdrop. If we simply drop the image on top of our footage we’ll still have a white backdrop behind this arrow appearing. We can get rid of this white backdrop by strategically using blend modes. This won’t work for every backdrop that you need to remove but if we have a simple black and white image like this one, We can remove the backdrop by setting our blend mode to “darken” or “multiply”. This will make it so that our clip only darkens what’s below. Since white can’t darken anything, we don’t see it. But because black is darker than anything else in our image, it will appear. Blend modes can also be really powerful for blending sources of light like fire elements lens flares and light leaks. Adding lens flares and light leaks to your shots is extremely easy in FilmoraPro with effects that you can simply drop right into your clips. For example, there’s the “light flares” effect which gives you a light source that you can animate. We used this effect in the “Text and Titles” tutorial. There’s also the “anamorphic lens flares” and “light leaks” effects, which you can throw onto your clip to get a more natural automatic look that responds to the brightness values in your clip. If we want to use the lens flares or light leaks independently of our clips for whatever reason, or if we want to use them as a way to create a transition, we can do so by creating a black plane bringing it into our timeline above our clips. Let’s add a “light flares” effect to our clip. The plan is for us to animate the brightness of this flare so that it gets really bright as we cut between our two clips, softening the feeling of the cut. Now, that’s great, but we can’t see our footage underneath. This is where we get back to blend modes. When working with light like we are here, good blend modes to use our “screen”, “add” or “lighten” which will all give us roughly the result we’re looking for but in slightly different ways. I’ll use “add”. So let’s find a flare we like, move the light source out of frame. Let’s also increase the scale of our flare a lot so that the effect fills the frame better. Let’s click the “display timeline” button up here and then create a keyframe right where the cut is by clicking this circle right by “Intensity” and bring our intensity way up… Next, let’s go back a bit create a keyframe and set our intensity to zero. We’ll go a bit ahead of the cut and set another keyframe once again to zero. And we’ll smooth the keyframe right in the middle, let’s take a look at that… It’s a little too fast, let’s do another adjustment. Let’s move our keyframes a little further apart… There we go! That looks a lot better. If you want to learn more about how keyframes work, feel free to check out our “Animation 101” video, link in the description. Final note about light leaks and lens flares: You can add a lot of pre-made light leaks and lens flares [from] online, Which usually involve a flare on a black background. Just like with our last example, we’ll also want to use blend modes like “screen” or “add” for best results. In fact, you can even experiment with other blend modes for more cool results! There are several different distortion effects you can use in FilmoraPro. These can sometimes be useful when you’re compositing an image or video into a scene. For example, we’ve got the static clip of the TV here. Since this was shot from a tripod, we can easily overlay a video on top of the TV with a few different distortion effects. “Perspective Warp” and “Bezier Warp” can be useful when conforming a video to a 3d shape, but today we’re going to be looking at “Quad Warp”. “Quad Warp” will let us remap the corners of our video to wherever we want to put them. In this case we’ll remap our corners to the corners of this TV screen. Now we can leave this as-is, but let’s make this effect a little more convincing. If we mute our track with the clip we overlaid, you can see that the TV below has been reflecting some light off its surface. In real life the TV would still reflect the light off of it regardless of if it’s on or off so to keep it around, let’s set our overlaid clips blend mode to “screen”. Next if we really want to feel like it’s coming from a TV, we could add a “scan lines” effect to the overlaid clip and place it above our “quad warp” effect. We’ll go in to our presets and set it to “light” and there we go. We’ve successfully overlaid a clip onto our TV screen! Here’s another example of a TV. This time, the TV is out of focus in the background. If we apply the same method as before to composite the video on to that TV screen it won’t look right since the video isn’t also out of focus. However, we can make it out of focus with a blur effect. FilmoraPro comes with various blur effects, but for the look we’re going for the regular “blur” effect will work great. Let’s drag it on to our clip and then in the controls panel, make sure the “blur” effect is on the bottom of our effects. We’ve got a little bit of weirdness happening around the edges so let’s uncheck “clamp to edge” and then increase the blur radius until our clip looks just right in the scene. And there we have it! A convincing screen replacement for an out-of-focus screen. So that’s a quick look at how you can start compositing in FilmoraPro. By now you should be familiar with layers and blend modes, how to create a picture-in-picture effect, working with light leaks and flares, and how to do basic screen replacement. Make sure to subscribe so you don’t miss out on more tutorials on how you can take your editing to the next level. There’s no limit to what you can make.

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