Baking And Melting Chocolate Simulations Are Now Possible! 馃崼

Baking And Melting Chocolate Simulations Are Now Possible! 馃崼


Dear Fellow Scholars, this is Two Minute Papers
with Károly Zsolnai-Fehér. This is one of those simulation papers where
you can look at it for three seconds and immediately know what it’s about. Let’s try that! Clearly, expansion and baking is happening. And now, let’s look inside. Mmmm! Yup, this is done. Clearly, this is a paper on simulating the
process of baking! Loving the idea. So how comprehensive is it? Well, other than these phenomena, for a proper
baking procedure, the simulator also has to be able to deal with melting, solidification,
dehydration, coloring and much, much more. This requires developing a proper thermomechanical
model where these materials are modeled as a collection of solids, water, and gas. Let’s have a look at some more results. And we have to stop right here, because I’d
like to tell you that the information density on this deceivingly simple scene is just stunning. In the x axis, from the left to the right
we have a decreasing temperature in the oven, left being the hottest, and chocolate chip
cookies above are simulated with an earlier work from 2014. The ones in the bottom row are made with the
new technique. You can see a different kind of shape change
as we increase the temperature, discoloration if we crank the oven up even more, and…look
there! Even the chocolate chips are melting. Oh my goodness! What a paper! Talking about information density, you can
also see here how these simulated pieces of dough of different viscosities react to different
amounts of stress. Viscosity means the amount of resistance against
deformation, therefore, as we go up, you can witness this kind of resistance increasing. Here you can see a cross section of the bread
which shows the amount of heat everywhere. This not only teaches us why crust forms on
the outside layer, but you can see how the amount of heat diffuses slowly into the inside. This is a maxed out paper. By this, I mean the execution quality is through
the roof, and the paper is considered done not when it looks alright, but when the idea
is being pushed to the limit and the work is as good as it can be without trivial ways
to improve it. And the results are absolute witchcraft. Huge congratulations to the authors. In fact, double congratulations because it
seems to me that this is only the second paper of Mengyuan Ding, the lead author, and it
has been accepted to the SIGGRAPH ASIA conference, which is one of the greatest achivements a
computer graphics researcher can dream of. A paper of such quality for the second try. Wow. This episode has been supported by Weights
& Biases. Weights & Biases provides tools to track your
experiments in your deep learning projects. It can save you a ton of time and money in
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support, and I’ll see you next time!

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